Course descriptions

EPI213 (Epidemiology of Cancer)

The aim of this course is to present an overview of the concepts and issues central to the discipline of cancer epidemiology. We will consider the descriptive epidemiology of cancer and discuss the implications of the biology of cancer for identification of risk factors and prospects for prevention. We present topics both with respect to key cancer exposures, including smoking, radiation, nutrition, and stress, and also delve deeply into the epidemiology of selected malignancies, including breast, prostate, colon, and pancreas.

EPI240 (Use of Biomarkers in Epidemiology Research)

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an overview of the issues pertinent to the collection, measurement, and analysis of biomarker data. The course aims to address general principles within the context of relevant examples.  Specifically at the completion of the course you will be able to: Describe sources of error in epidemiologic studies using biomarkers and how to minimize these errors in the context of specific study designs; quantitatively determine measures of error in biomarker studies, including the coefficient of variation and interclass correlation, as well as how to correct risk estimates for various sources of error and address specific analytic concerns, including sample size issues, related to biomarker data; describe practical measures needed to collect biological specimens from study populations and understand critical issues in collection, processing, and storage of samples; understand the process of biomarker discovery in understanding disease etiology, prevention, and detection.

EPI246 (Applied Biomarkers in Cancer Epidemiology)

The focus of this course is on application and interpretation of cancer studies using biomarkers. Topics include biomarkers of exposure, biomarkers related to metabolism/activation and other biological pathways, intermediate/surrogate endpoints, markers of early cancer detection and prognosis. Examples are discussed in each topic to demonstrate different issues in the interpretation of results. Class will be split into one hour lectures and one hour discussions of assigned readings.

EPI249 (Molecular Biology for Epidemiologists)

By the end of this course, students should be able to: Understand the mechanisms and regulatory processes involved in different steps of the central dogma of molecular biology; understand how cellular mechanisms go awry and how cells can repair these; gain a basic understanding of Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics, meiosis, and mitosis; be familiar with the advantages and disadvantages of various molecular tools and study designs commonly used in molecular epidemiology research.

EPI257 (Advanced Seminar in Cancer Epidemiology)

The goal of this course is to present an integrated view of current issues central to cancer epidemiology. This course assumes that students have a basic understanding of key cancer exposures, including smoking, radiation, nutrition, and hormones. We will build on knowledge gained in other courses and cover cancer sites not typically discussed in other courses including lymphoma, melanoma and cervical cancer. Additionally, we will cover methods related topics such as cancer survival, and use of cancer registries. There will be an emphasis on a more global perspective to cancer epidemiology, integration of knowledge across cancer sites. In addition, we will cover current and emerging topics in cancer epidemiology.

EPI508 (Pathology for Epidemiologists)

This course provides students an introduction to pathology as a tool to understand the pathogenesis of disease, with a focus on pathology of cancer and pre-neoplastic conditions.  Students will be exposed to the systems of classification of tumors and other processes through review of histology slides. In addition, they will be introduced to immunohistochemistry and other molecular pathology techniques used in epidemiology research. At the end of the course, the students will be able to: Have an overview of the role of pathology in understanding the pathogenesis and functional manifestations of disease; understand the system of classification of tumors and other processes in classification of diseases; have an understanding of the use of immunohistochemistry and molecular pathology techniques, particularly as they relate to epidemiological research.

EPI518 (Infections and Cancer)

The purpose of this course is to provide a general introduction to the issues central to evaluating the role of infections in the etiology of human malignancy. At the end of the course, students will be able to: Critically analyze epidemiologic evidence for an infectious etiology of major human infection-associated malignancies; design strategies and methodological approaches for the investigation of infection-related malignancies; analyze the utility of various biomarkers in the investigation of infection-related malignancies; critically analyze the data related to a newly identified infection-associated malignancy or an aspect of an established association that requires additional study and design a study and a grant proposal to evaluate the association.

ID510 (Nutritional Epidemiology of Cancer)

At the completion of the course, you will be able to: Describe in-depth current hot topics in research on the relation of nutrition to cancer; critically analyze studies of nutrition and cancer topics using different study designs; describe the different components of a grant; design a study on a specific nutritional factor and cancer topic and write a grant proposal on that topic.

ID520 (Advanced Topics in Nutrition and Cancer)

At the completion of the course, you will be able to: Describe in-depth several current nutrition and cancer topics; critically analyze studies of nutrition and cancer topics using different study designs; summarize the published literature on a nutrition and cancer topic; lead a class discussion on a nutrition and cancer topic.

EPI269 (Epidemiologic Research in Obstetrics and Gynecology)

This course will provide insight into the design and implementation of epidemiologic studies within a clinical framework.  The course focuses on methods used in reproductive epidemiology with the goal of acquiring knowledge to evaluate published literature and to design observation research.  In addition, the course will emphasize the clinical and physiological underpinnings of the methods and results from epidemiologic research in the areas of contraception, infertility, pregnancy, menopause, and both benign and malignant gynecological conditions.