Author Archives: Chris Ternan - Web Team

Guidance on the “Heartbleed” Internet security vulnerability

To All SPH Faculty, Staff, and Students:

Last week, a security flaw dubbed “the Heartbleed bug” was discovered in a common Internet security protocol (OpenSSL) that protects credentials, such as usernames, passwords, and credit card numbers. An explanation of this flaw can be found on the Harvard Information Security website at: http://security.harvard.edu/heartbleed.  Harvard IT professionals across the University, and our own server team, web team, and Andy Ross our security manager, acted quickly to assess and patch any websites or applications that may have been vulnerable.  The Harvard PIN system and other enterprise applications were not affected as a result of Heartbleed, and Harvard Information Security currently has no indication that any information has been compromised.

Although there is a low risk that your Harvard account credentials were compromised, you are at greater risk if you use the same password for your Harvard accounts as for your personal accounts, such as personal email, social media, and other websites. We strongly recommend that you change your Harvard password immediately if you have also used it for external non-Harvard accounts.   Furthermore, it is important to not use the same password for Harvard and personal accounts going forward. It is always good practice to periodically change all your account passwords, and this may be a good opportunity to refresh your Harvard passwords even if you believe you are at low risk of being affected by Heartbleed.

You can find full instructions on how to change your Harvard passwords on our I/T Dept. website at: http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic731455.files/password_information_41414.pdfIf you have an SPH encrypted laptop,  pay close attention to the instructions under section 2.2 and 2.3.   Also, BEFORE changing your OUTLOOK Email password (see section 2.5), be sure to turn off all your portable devices (iPhone/iPad/Android/Tablet), to avoid your email getting locked out on that device.

If you have any questions or concerns about this security issue or need assistance to change your passwords, please contact the Helpdesk at 617-432-HELP or Helpdesk@hsph.harvard.edu  (Mon-Fri: 8 a.m.-6 p.m.)

Taso Markatos
CIO, SPH I/T Dept.

New Staff Addition: Nick Kashner

Nick Kashner

Nick Kashner

Nick Kashner began working as a co-op on February 5 and will be working 10 hours each week through June as part of his program at Roxbury Community College (RCC).  He is a candidate for an associate degree in Web Technologies with an anticipated graduation date of June 2015.

Nick is a Pawlet Scholarship Award winner and a member of the Alpha Delta Phi Literacy Society at Northeastern University. He has an impressive 3.75 GPA.

Nick is our seventh co-op in the HSPH-RCC partnership coordinated by the HSPH Office of Human Resources.

Please join us in welcoming Nick to the Harvard School of Public Health!

WordPress Updates

Over winter break the WebTeam was hard at work making some changes and updates to the website. Most of these changes are related to performance and optimization, so you will not be able to see them. However, there are two main changes that we would like to call to your attention.

widget visibilityWidget Visibility

Widget Visibility is a new module that enables you to configure widgets to appear or to be hidden only on certain pages through use of the Visibility panel. If you cannot see the Widget Visibility module, please contact the WebTeam to have it enabled. For full documentation on how this module works, check out the article here: http://wordpress.sph.harvard.edu/web-tech/faq-category/side-bar/

Heading StylesHeading Styles

When the website went live almost a year ago, the vendor assigned font styles to the headings H2, H3, and so on down the line, but the heading H1 was never utilized. Because H1 is the most important heading tag for search engines and content optimization, we reintroduced the H1 tag in its proper position (as the title line for each page). We strongly suggest that you look at your pages and update the heading styles to reflect this addition of H1. Doing so will maintain consistency and search/content optimization across the HSPH website. We will be discussing the heading styles further at the WordPress trainings.

Upcoming Trainings

As always, we have some more training sessions to announce for the month of January. One is focused on WordPress, while the other is an open-air session to answer any questions you may have. Please visit: http://hsph.me/wp for more info.

New Spring Coop: Lawrence Manigault

We are pleased to welcome a new coop this spring from Roxbury Community College, Lawrence Manigault.  This placement is part of a new partnership coordinated by the HSPH Office of Human Resources.  Lawrence is our third coop with Hansel Ruiz and  Moses Mokuolu completing assignments in the fall.

Lawrence will work 10-12 hours each week providing computer support to the community at the Helpdesk, as well as in the field, with support and training provided by our User Services team.

He is a candidate for an associate degree in information systems technology and has outstanding technical skills.

Lawrence Manigault

Please join us in welcoming Lawrence to our technical staff and to the HSPH community!

TODAY: Watch Live Forum Webcast

FIGHTING THE CLOCK: How America’s Sleep Deficit is Damaging Longterm Health

Presented in Collaboration with The Huffington Post

  • Date: Tuesday, March 6
  • Time: 2-3 PM ET
  • Watch at www.ForumHSPH.org and share the link with your colleagues.

PARTICIPATE DURING THE LIVE WEBCAST

Join the live chat at 1:30 p.m. ET, which will be featured on The Forum’s Fighting the Clock: How America’s Sleep Deficit is Damaging Longterm Health web page. We’ll also be live-tweeting from @ForumHSPH.

MODERATOR

  • Alana B. Elias Kornfeld, Editor In Chief, Healthy Living, The Huffington Post

EXPERT PARTICIPANTS

  • Charles Czeisler, Chief, Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Professor of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Susan Redline, Professor of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Director, Programs in Sleep and Cardiovascular Medicine and Sleep Medicine Epidemiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • Frank Hu, Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health
  • Lucian Leape, Chair, Lucian Leape Institute at the National Patient Safety Foundation, and Adjunct Professor of Health Policy, Harvard School of Public Health

American society conspires against the need for sleep. Children set off for school before many workdays begin. Tough financial times push cash-strapped workers into seeking multiple jobs. Shift work conflicts with the body’s natural clock. Hard-charging executives push themselves to work long hours. The cost is more than fatigue. Sleep deprivation has been associated with a myriad of health problems, including increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke and depression. Cognitive abilities decline as people tire. Risky behavior, such as driving while deeply fatigued, can put others in harm’s way. This Forum event — held just days before the country will lose an hour of sleep due to daylight saving time — will explore what we mean by “sleep deprivation,” what happens in tired brains and bodies, what are the longterm health risks for children and adults, and what kinds of policies should be considered for schools and businesses to protect health. And a good night’s sleep.

TODAY: Watch Live Forum Webcast

THE TOXIC STRESS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD ADVERSITY:
Rethinking Health and Education Policy

  • Date: TODAY, Tuesday, February 7, 2012
  • Time: 3-4 PM ET
  • Watch at www.ForumHSPH.org  and share the link with your colleagues.
  • Join the live chat, which will begin at 2:30 PM ET.

MODERATOR

  • Abigail Trafford, Author and Former Health Editor, The Washington Post

EXPERT PARTICIPANTS

  • Jack Shonkoff, Director, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, and Professor of Child Health and Development, Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • Robert Block, President, American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Roberto Rodríguez, Special Assistant to the President for Education Policy, The White House

Evidence suggests that for the youngest children, prolonged or severe exposure to abuse, neglect and economic hardship — exacerbated by a dearth of stable, supportive relationships with adults — can provoke a “toxic stress response” with lifelong consequences. Such stress may influence brain development and increase the risk for illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes. While efforts have been made for decades to intervene early in children’s lives, the results have not always been resounding. This Forum event will examine how health and education policies can be both harnessed and revamped to counteract early childhood adversity and will include a discussion of a new policy statement, “Early Childhood Adversity, Toxic Stress, and the Role of the Pediatrician: Translating Developmental Science Into Lifelong Health,” issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

ASK THE EXPERT PARTICIPANTS

  • Tweet your questions using the hash tag #kidsforum
  • E-mail theforum@hsph.harvard.edu
  • Submit your questions to the Community Discussion page

PARTICIPATE DURING THE LIVE WEBCAST

  • In addition to our 2:30 p.m. live chat, you can participate in our Twitter conversation by using the hashtag #kidsforum. We’ll also be live-tweeting from @ForumHSPH.

HSPH Launches New Alumni Portal

HSPH launched a new alumni portal on September 15, 2011.  Congratulations to Jim Smith, Assistant Dean for Alumni Affairs, for his leadership in launching this impressive new alumni resource.

HSPH’s Department of Information Technology web team provided design and technical support for Jim and his staff working in collaboration with the vendor Imodules.

Visit the site:
http://alumni.sph.harvard.edu

Screenshots:

Alumni Home Page

Alumni Directory Search