Category Archives: Media Services

Our Harvard Hero

Congratulations to Sarah Bearse, HSPH Leadership Studio Technical Manager, for being recognized by the University in the Harvard Heroes Program.  With many outstanding candidates from all over the University, only 49 individuals from more than 12,000 Harvard staff were selected as Harvard Heroes in 2012.

 

On June 5th, Sarah and her invited guests (family, friends, and colleagues) will attend a celebration for 2012 Harvard Heroes in Sanders Theater hosted by President Faust with a reception in the Harvard Faculty Club.

Sarah received the news from our HR Partner Elissa Chambers and Robin Herman, Director of the Forum at HSPH

 

 

Global Climate Change Course Offering

During the Spring 2 semester, HSPH is collaborating with Harvard’s Extension School on a distance learning pilot.  The course on global climate change is taught by Professor Aaron Bernstein and a number of guest lecturers.  The pilot offers the course both as a residential course at HSPH and also as a distance learning course through the Harvard Extension School.

The course uses a mixture of equipment from HSPH and from Extension School.  As part of this pilot, we installed some additional production lighting and audio equipment in Kresge G2 to improve overall production quality.

Professor Bernstein introduces the course at the first session.

Extension School students may view lectures either live or on-demand.

On the technical-side, HSPH’s Sarah Bearse, Christopher Riley, Mike Demarco and Erin Leveille are working with Division of Continuing Education colleagues Christian Wisewarver, Rod Linheim, and James Peregrino on the project.

 

Live from the HSPH Leadership Studio

Professor Walter Willett appeared on both ABC and CBS national news programming this week.  The recordings conveniently took place live from the HSPH Leadership Studio on Kresge 10th Floor.

CBS News Link

View News Reports:

Soda a day may lead to heart attacks in men, CBS News

Is Red Meat Hazardous to Your Health?, ABC News

The studio productions were staffed by Department of Information Technology’s Sarah Bearse and Christopher Riley.

 

 

TODAY: Watch Live Forum Webcast

FIGHTING THE CLOCK: How America’s Sleep Deficit is Damaging Longterm Health

Presented in Collaboration with The Huffington Post

  • Date: Tuesday, March 6
  • Time: 2-3 PM ET
  • Watch at www.ForumHSPH.org and share the link with your colleagues.

PARTICIPATE DURING THE LIVE WEBCAST

Join the live chat at 1:30 p.m. ET, which will be featured on The Forum’s Fighting the Clock: How America’s Sleep Deficit is Damaging Longterm Health web page. We’ll also be live-tweeting from @ForumHSPH.

MODERATOR

  • Alana B. Elias Kornfeld, Editor In Chief, Healthy Living, The Huffington Post

EXPERT PARTICIPANTS

  • Charles Czeisler, Chief, Division of Sleep Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Professor of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School
  • Susan Redline, Professor of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Director, Programs in Sleep and Cardiovascular Medicine and Sleep Medicine Epidemiology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
  • Frank Hu, Professor of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health
  • Lucian Leape, Chair, Lucian Leape Institute at the National Patient Safety Foundation, and Adjunct Professor of Health Policy, Harvard School of Public Health

American society conspires against the need for sleep. Children set off for school before many workdays begin. Tough financial times push cash-strapped workers into seeking multiple jobs. Shift work conflicts with the body’s natural clock. Hard-charging executives push themselves to work long hours. The cost is more than fatigue. Sleep deprivation has been associated with a myriad of health problems, including increased risk of obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke and depression. Cognitive abilities decline as people tire. Risky behavior, such as driving while deeply fatigued, can put others in harm’s way. This Forum event — held just days before the country will lose an hour of sleep due to daylight saving time — will explore what we mean by “sleep deprivation,” what happens in tired brains and bodies, what are the longterm health risks for children and adults, and what kinds of policies should be considered for schools and businesses to protect health. And a good night’s sleep.

TEDxHSPH to be held on April 5, 2012

HSPH’s Office for Educational Programs and the HSPH Student Government will be hosting TEDxHSPH as part of the TEDxChange 2012 event live from Berlin. The event includes a simulcast of the event live from Berlin followed by a local program.

The event will be held in the HSPH Leadership Studio.

TEDxChange 2012 – April 5, 2012, live from Berlin

TEDxChange 2012 is a TEDx event co-organized by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and TED. Convened by Melinda French Gates and hosted by Chris Anderson, TEDxChange will focus on issues surrounding global health and development. TEDxChange type events are TEDx events hosted around the live webcast of TEDxChange, and also feature local speakers. Our event is called TEDxHSPH, and is one of many TEDx events happening around the globe on April 5th that will expand on the ideas brought up at TEDxChange 2010.

About the Tedxchange Program

TODAY: Watch Live Forum Webcast

THE TOXIC STRESS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD ADVERSITY:
Rethinking Health and Education Policy

  • Date: TODAY, Tuesday, February 7, 2012
  • Time: 3-4 PM ET
  • Watch at www.ForumHSPH.org  and share the link with your colleagues.
  • Join the live chat, which will begin at 2:30 PM ET.

MODERATOR

  • Abigail Trafford, Author and Former Health Editor, The Washington Post

EXPERT PARTICIPANTS

  • Jack Shonkoff, Director, Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University, and Professor of Child Health and Development, Harvard School of Public Health and Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • Robert Block, President, American Academy of Pediatrics
  • Roberto Rodríguez, Special Assistant to the President for Education Policy, The White House

Evidence suggests that for the youngest children, prolonged or severe exposure to abuse, neglect and economic hardship — exacerbated by a dearth of stable, supportive relationships with adults — can provoke a “toxic stress response” with lifelong consequences. Such stress may influence brain development and increase the risk for illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes. While efforts have been made for decades to intervene early in children’s lives, the results have not always been resounding. This Forum event will examine how health and education policies can be both harnessed and revamped to counteract early childhood adversity and will include a discussion of a new policy statement, “Early Childhood Adversity, Toxic Stress, and the Role of the Pediatrician: Translating Developmental Science Into Lifelong Health,” issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

ASK THE EXPERT PARTICIPANTS

  • Tweet your questions using the hash tag #kidsforum
  • E-mail theforum@hsph.harvard.edu
  • Submit your questions to the Community Discussion page

PARTICIPATE DURING THE LIVE WEBCAST

  • In addition to our 2:30 p.m. live chat, you can participate in our Twitter conversation by using the hashtag #kidsforum. We’ll also be live-tweeting from @ForumHSPH.

Live from the Leadership Studio

HSPH faculty member Gregory Connolly was interviewed from the HSPH Leadership Studio on January 10, 2012 by ABC News on recent research that reveals that nicotine replacement therapies may not be effective in helping people quit smoking.

View video

One day earlier, HSPH researcher Hillel Alpert was interviewed by the Canadian Broadcast Company (CBC) on the same study.

See also: HSPH press release and Harvard Gazette article.

 

Upgrades to Kresge G1, G2, and G3 slated for December 19-21

UPDATE: All upgrades were successfully completed.

The Department of Information Technology will be making significant upgrades to the infrastructure that powers Kresge G1, G2, and G3 control systems from Monday, December 19, 2011 through Wednesday, December 21, 2011.   Similar upgrades were made to Kresge 213 and to the HSPH central control room earlier in 2011.  The only change noticeable for instructors and presenters will be new and improved touchscreens.

This works completes modest upgrades to keep our busiest rooms fully operational and without fail.

All of these rooms now have new projectors, new touch panels, and new processors.  In addition to the work in these rooms, projectors were replaced in our largest student computing laboratory, Kresge LL6.