Degree & Curriculum

Need For ProgramSwimming

Occupational injury is a large public health burden. Within the United States alone 5100 people lost their lives on the job due to an unintentional injury in 1998 (National Safety Council, 1999). That is a rate of 14 deaths per calendar day. In 1998, 3.8 million workers in America suffered a disabling injury. This estimate, while still small compared to a 1994 estimate of 6.3 million (NORA Committee, 1998), is still larger than 1% of the total US population. Cost estimates for occupational injuries in 1998 add up to $125 billion. This cost is well on par with the cost of treating other large public health diseases such as cancer and heart disease in U.S. (Leigh et al., 1997) and well above the profits of the top Fortune 500 companies. In 1996 the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) established the National Occupational Research Agenda (NORA), which identified traumatic injury as a research priority area.

Degrees

Masters

The Master’s program requires two years of course work for the completion of 80 credit hours. The program in ergonomics and safety has been approved as an area of concentration within the Department of Environmental Health by the Harvard School of Public Health’s Committee on Educational Policy. For a concentration in injury prevention, the curriculum requires two classes, Injury Epidemiology and Principles of Injury Control.

Doctoral

The Doctoral program requires a minimum of two years of course work for the completion of 80 credit hours plus an additional two to three years to complete a research thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive oral qualifying examination at the end of their coursework. For the exam, students prepare a thesis research proposal that demonstrates their capability in scientific and critical thinking as well as communicating their work. Upon completing their research they must produce three publishable papers based on their doctoral research.

Post-Doctoral

The Post-Doctoral training program is a non-degree granting program and requires a minimum of two years. Trainees are required to take all of the specialty injury prevention research courses (approximately 15 credits) and complete a research internship. The program also requires presentations in research seminars, occupational medicine grand rounds or class lectures, and peer reviewed publications.

Curriculum

General Description of Requirements
Students are expected to first master information and competencies in occupational injury prevention and control. The higher-level courses each relate different principles, methods, and theories that are directly applicable to occupational injury prevention research and allow for the trainees to focus in either occupational injury epidemiology or occupational ergonomics and safety. Training specialization is achieved through a collection of both required courses and electives to complete the degree requirements.
For the master’s program, the curriculum requires 2 years of course work for the completion of 80 credit hours. The program in ergonomics and safety has been approved by the HSPH Committee on Educational Policy as an area of concentration within the Department of Environmental Health. For a concentration in injury prevention, the curriculum requires two classes: Injury Epidemiology and Principles of Injury Control.
For the doctoral program, the proposed curriculum requires a minimum of 2 years of course work for the completion of 80 credit hours plus an additional 2–3 years to complete a research thesis. Students must also complete a comprehensive oral qualifying examination at the end of their coursework. For the exam, students prepare a thesis research proposal that demonstrates their capability in scientific and critical thinking as well as communicating their work. Upon completing their research, they must produce three publishable papers based on their doctoral research.
The postdoctoral training program is a non-degree program and requires a minimum of 2 years. Trainees are encouraged to take all the specialty injury prevention research courses (approximately 15 credits). The program also requires presentations in research seminars, occupational medicine Grand Rounds or class lectures, and peer-reviewed publications.

Core Competencies
The Occupational Injury Prevention Research Training Program is academically aligned with other ERC academic cores and the curricula of other HSPH academic departments and programs; a collection of degree- and course-specific competencies were determined following faculty discussion and deliberation during the self-study process that leads to accreditation by the Council on Education in Public Health (CEPH). These Core/Component-specific competencies are the foundation of the Core/Component course content, and the basis for evaluation of student achievement. They guide syllabus development and provide goals and definition to the Core. Students can access a list of these competencies through the department websites. The core competencies for the OIPRT doctoral program are as follows:
•    Demonstrate basic skills in core public health sciences of epidemiology and biostatistics (listed in the MPH Curriculum Guide).
•    Describe the health effects of occupational exposures.
•    Design and conduct health and safety hazard evaluations.
•    Identify, design, and conduct basic occupational epidemiologic and intervention investigations.
•    Continue to develop the skills to organize and administer occupational health programs.
•    Explain the scientific basis of occupational and environmental health regulations.
•    Demonstrate research skills in a major field of concentration relevant to occupational injury prevention.

More extensive and up-to-date information can be found in the Student Handbook

 

Year 1  FallSemester credits  Year 1   Spring Semester credits
Principles of Biostatistics 5.0 Environmental and Occ Epidemiology 2.5
Principles of Epidemiology 2.5 Occ Safety and Injury Prevention 2.5
Work Environment 2.5 Occ and Environmental Medicine 2.5
Human Physiology 5.0 Principles of Injury Control 2.5
Ergonomics and Human Factors 2.5 Electives 10
Electives 2.5
Year 1  FallSemester credits  Year 1   Spring Semester credits
Principles of Biostatistics 5.0 Environmental and Occ Epidemiology 2.5
Principles of Epidemiology 2.5 Occ Safety and Injury Prevention 2.5
Work Environment 2.5 Occ and Environmental Medicine 2.5
Human Physiology 5.0 Principles of Injury Control 2.5

Dissertation Research and continued participation in theresearch seminars and occupational health grand rounds occupy Years 3 and 4.
Postdoctoral Curriculum: An assessment of knowledge in occupational safety engineering andscience and occupational injury epidemiology is made on an individual basisthrough faculty advisement.  If anyknowledge areas that require increased learning are identified, advisorsrecommend the appropriate occupational health courses.  To give postdoctoral students specialtytraining in occupational injury prevention, the five specialized courses thatinclude Occupational Injury Epidemiology and Prevention, Occupational Safetyand Injury Prevention, Principles of Injury Control, Introduction to High RiskBehaviors, and Decision Analysis for Health and Medicine are required.
We have not requested any funding for the post-doctoral ormaster’s levels training, but we believe they are an important part to ourcomprehensive approach to Occupational Injury Prevention ResearchTraining.  The ERC Advisory Committee hasalso strongly recommended a post-doctoral training component.  We have successfully secured funding for fourpostdoctoral fellowship slots via the Liberty Mutual – HSPH Program forOccupational Safety and Health and these trainees work jointly with HSPH andLiberty Mutual Investigators on collaborative projects.  For example, Dr. Kezhi Jin from Fudan Universityis a postdoctoral fellow in the program. He has implemented a case crossover hand injury study in hand surgeryclinics in Shanghaiand has collected epidemiologic information on over 700 hand injury cases.  He has split his time between Liberty Mutualand HSPH and has been co-advised by Ted Courtney and David Lombardi at Liberty Mutual andMelissa Perry at HPSH.  He has publisheda pilot report on the hand injury study (Jin et al., 2007) and is currentlypreparing the first descriptive report of the full study.

Year 1  FallSemester credits  Year 1   Spring Semester credits
Principles of Biostatistics 5.0 Environmental and Occ Epidemiology 2.5
Principles of Epidemiology 2.5 Occ Safety and Injury Prevention 2.5
Work Environment 2.5 Occ and Environmental Medicine 2.5
Human Physiology 5.0 Principles of Injury Control 2.5
Ergonomics and Human Factors 2.5 Electives 10
Electives 2.5
Year 1  FallSemester credits  Year 1   Spring Semester credits
Principles of Biostatistics 5.0 Environmental and Occ Epidemiology 2.5
Principles of Epidemiology 2.5 Occ Safety and Injury Prevention 2.5
Work Environment 2.5 Occ and Environmental Medicine 2.5
Human Physiology 5.0 Principles of Injury Control 2.5

Dissertation Research and continued participation in theresearch seminars and occupational health grand rounds occupy Years 3 and 4.
Postdoctoral Curriculum: An assessment of knowledge in occupational safety engineering andscience and occupational injury epidemiology is made on an individual basisthrough faculty advisement.  If anyknowledge areas that require increased learning are identified, advisorsrecommend the appropriate occupational health courses.  To give postdoctoral students specialtytraining in occupational injury prevention, the five specialized courses thatinclude Occupational Injury Epidemiology and Prevention, Occupational Safetyand Injury Prevention, Principles of Injury Control, Introduction to High RiskBehaviors, and Decision Analysis for Health and Medicine are required.
We have not requested any funding for the post-doctoral ormaster’s levels training, but we believe they are an important part to ourcomprehensive approach to Occupational Injury Prevention ResearchTraining.  The ERC Advisory Committee hasalso strongly recommended a post-doctoral training component.  We have successfully secured funding for fourpostdoctoral fellowship slots via the Liberty Mutual – HSPH Program forOccupational Safety and Health and these trainees work jointly with HSPH andLiberty Mutual Investigators on collaborative projects.  For example, Dr. Kezhi Jin from Fudan Universityis a postdoctoral fellow in the program. He has implemented a case crossover hand injury study in hand surgeryclinics in Shanghaiand has collected epidemiologic information on over 700 hand injury cases.  He has split his time between Liberty Mutualand HSPH and has been co-advised by Ted Courtney and David Lombardi at Liberty Mutual andMelissa Perry at HPSH.  He has publisheda pilot report on the hand injury study (Jin et al., 2007) and is currentlypreparing the first descriptive report of the full study.

Curriculum

Click Here for Course Information

TrainingApproach: The program’s unified training approach takes a holistic view ofworkplace hazards and focuses on the prevention of injury and illnessassociated with those hazards. The components of the approach include theidentification, measurement and evaluation of occupational hazards; the studyof the occurrence of work-related injury and illness; the design oforganizational and engineering controls, and the development of management andsurveillance systems. This multidisciplinary approach integrates thetraditional engineering techniques to the assessment and control ofoccupational hazards with the occupational health and safety approach toprevention of injury and illness for a progressive modern program.

Generaldescription of requirements: Students are expected to first masterinformation and competencies in occupational injury prevention and control. Thehigher-level courses each relate different principles, methods and theoriesthat are directly applicable to occupational injury prevention research andallow for the trainees to focus in either occupational injury epidemiology oroccupational safety engineering and science. Training specialization isachieved through occupational health, environmental science and engineering,health and social behavior and health policy and management courses that offeradvanced teachings in safety engineering, ergonomics, biomechanics, behavioralepidemiology and health services research.

Advisement/Mentorship:Trainees are assigned to one of the core or supporting program faculty foradvisement soon after admission to the program. Together with their adviser, acustomized curriculum plan is developed based on required courses and specificelectives. Students will meet periodically with advisors for the followingpurposes: to review progress toward satisfactory completion of course work(including options for elective courses); to prepare for written exams, todevelop research proposals, to access sources for data collection andmanagement, and to review drafts of papers. Our experience with training inother occupational health specialty areas has emphasized that the studentadvisement/mentorship training component for both pre and postdoctoral studentsis critical to the success of the overall training program.

Curriculumcontent: Course requirements draw from several curriculum sources fromwithin the School of Public Health, as well as M.I.T, and the Division ofEngineering and Applied Sciences at HarvardUniversity. Corerequirements include requirements of the school and specific classes for injuryprevention research. Pre-doctoral students are required to complete a minimumof 40 credits. Twenty of these credits have to be in occupational injuryprevention research with a focus on either occupational safety engineering andscience or occupational injury epidemiology. The other twenty must contain 10in each of two declared minors (e.g, Health Policy and Management or Health andSocial Behavior).

 

DoctoralCurriculum: 

The course curriculum for Doctoral training includes thefollowing components:

1.   Requirements foroccupational injury prevention research, which include Principles ofEpidemiology, Principles of Biostatistics, Multiple Regression Analysis, HumanPhysiology, Scientific Basis of Occupational Health Regulations, OccupationalSafety and Injury Prevention, Work Environment, Risk Assessment, Practice ofOccupational Health, Principles of Injury Control, Decision Analysis for Healthand Medicine, and Research Ethics.  Thesecourses provide a foundation for all trainees to apply research in injuryprevention.

2.   Majorconcentration requirements and electives for occupational safety engineeringand science, which include Occupational Biomechanics, Ergonomics/Human Factors,Protection of Workers from Hazardous Substances, Noise and Vibration, HumanFactors Engineering, Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement, SystemAnalysis and Physiology Applications, and Muscle Reflexes and Locomotion.

3.   Majorconcentration requirements and electives for occupational injury epidemiology,which include Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology, Occupational InjuryEpidemiology and Prevention, Implementing Prevention and Practice ofEpidemiology.

4.   Other electiveswhich fulfill the 40 credit major and minor concentration requirement includePrinciples of Toxicology, Occupational Health Services Research, ExposureAssessment, Pathophysiology, Statistical Methods for Health Policy andManagement, Society and Health, Psychosocial Theories of Health Behavior, CommunityIntervention Research Methods, and Urban Violence in America.

The tables below present a typical course schedule anddemonstrate sequence for completing course work.

Click Here for Course Information
Training Approach: The program’s unified training approach takes a holistic view ofworkplace hazards and focuses on the prevention of injury and illnessassociated with those hazards. The components of the approach include theidentification, measurement and evaluation of occupational hazards; the study of the occurrence of work-related injury and illness; the design of organizational and engineering controls, and the development of management and surveillance systems. This multidisciplinary approach integrates the traditional engineering techniques to the assessment and control ofoccupational hazards with the occupational health and safety approach to prevention of injury and illness for a progressive modern program.
General description of requirements: Students are expected to first master information and competencies in occupational injury prevention and control. The higher-level courses each relate different principles, methods and theories that are directly applicable to occupational injury prevention research and allow for the trainees to focus in either occupational injury epidemiology oroccupational safety engineering and science. Training specialization is achieved through occupational health, environmental science and engineering,health and social behavior and health policy and management courses that offer advanced teachings in safety engineering, ergonomics, biomechanics, behavioral epidemiology and health services research.
Advisement/Mentorship:Trainees are assigned to one of the core or supporting program faculty for advisement soon after admission to the program. Together with their adviser, acustomized curriculum plan is developed based on required courses and specific electives. Students will meet periodically with advisors for the following purposes: to review progress toward satisfactory completion of course work (including options for elective courses); to prepare for written exams, to develop research proposals, to access sources for data collection and management, and to review drafts of papers. Our experience with training inother occupational health specialty areas has emphasized that the student advisement/mentorship training component for both pre and post doctoral students is critical to the success of the overall training program.
Curriculum content: Course requirements draw from several curriculum sources from within the School of Public Health, as well as M.I.T, and the Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. Core requirements include requirements of the school and specific classes for injury prevention research. Pre-doctoral students are required to complete a minimum of 40 credits. Twenty of these credits have to be in occupational injury prevention research with a focus on either occupational safety engineering and science or occupational injury epidemiology. The other twenty must contain 10 in each of two declared minors (e.g, Health Policy and Management or Health and Social Behavior).
Doctoral Curriculum: 
More extensive information can be found in the Student Handbook.
 The course curriculum for Doctoral training includes the following components:
1.   Requirements for occupational injury prevention research, which include Principles of Epidemiology, Principles of Biostatistics, Multiple Regression Analysis, Human Physiology, Scientific Basis of Occupational Health Regulations, Occupational Safety and Injury Prevention, Work Environment, Risk Assessment, Practice of Occupational Health, Principles of Injury Control, Decision Analysis for Health and Medicine, and Research Ethics.  These courses provide a foundation for all trainees to apply research in injury prevention.
2.   Major concentration requirements and electives for occupational safety engineeringand science, which include Occupational Biomechanics, Ergonomics/Human Factors,Protection of Workers from Hazardous Substances, Noise and Vibration, Human Factors Engineering, Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement, System Analysis and Physiology Applications, and Muscle Reflexes and Locomotion.
3.   Major concentration requirements and electives for occupational injury epidemiology, which include Environmental and Occupational Epidemiology, Occupational Injury Epidemiology and Prevention, Implementing Prevention and Practice of Epidemiology.
4.   Other electives which fulfill the 40 credit major and minor concentration requirement include Principles of Toxicology, Occupational Health Services Research, ExposureAssessment, Pathophysiology, Statistical Methods for Health Policy and Management, Society and Health, Psychosocial Theories of Health Behavior, Community Intervention Research Methods, and Urban Violence in America.
Dissertation Research and continued participation in the research seminars and occupational health grand rounds occupy Years 3 and 4.
Post-doctoral Curriculum: An assessment of knowledge in occupational safety engineering and science and occupational injury epidemiology is made on an individual basisthrough faculty advisement.  If any knowledge areas that require increased learning are identified, advisors recommend the appropriate occupational health courses.  To give postdoctoral students specialtytraining in occupational injury prevention, the five specialized courses that include Occupational Injury Epidemiology and Prevention, Occupational Safetyand Injury Prevention, Principles of Injury Control, Introduction to High Risk Behaviors, and Decision Analysis for Health and Medicine are required.
We have not requested any funding for the post-doctoral ormaster’s levels training, but we believe they are an important part to our comprehensive approach to Occupational Injury Prevention ResearchTraining.  The ERC Advisory Committee has also strongly recommended a post-doctoral training component.  We have successfully secured funding for four postdoctoral fellowship slots via the Liberty Mutual – HSPH Program for Occupational Safety and Health and these trainees work jointly with HSPH and Liberty Mutual Investigators on collaborative projects.  For example, Dr. Kezhi Jin from Fudan University is a postdoctoral fellow in the program. He has implemented a case crossover hand injury study in hand surgery clinics in Shanghai and has collected epidemiologic information on over 700 hand injury cases.  He has split his time between Liberty Mutualand HSPH and has been co-advised by Ted Courtney and David Lombardi at Liberty Mutual and Melissa Perry at HPSH.  He has published a pilot report on the hand injury study (Jin et al., 2007) and is currently preparing the first descriptive report of the full study.

Curriculum

Click Here for Course Information

Training Approach: The program’s unified training approach takes aholistic view of workplace hazards and focuses on the prevention of injury andillness associated with those hazards. The components of the approach includethe identification, measurement and evaluation of occupational hazards; thestudy of the occurrence of work-related injury and illness; the design oforganizational and engineering controls, and the development of management andsurveillance systems. This multidisciplinary approach integrates thetraditional engineering techniques to the assessment and control ofoccupational hazards with the occupational health and safety approach toprevention of injury and illness for a progressive modern program.

General description of requirements: Students are expected to firstmaster information and competencies in occupational injury prevention andcontrol. The higher-level courses each relate different principles, methods andtheories that are directly applicable to occupational injury preventionresearch and allow for the trainees to focus in either occupational injuryepidemiology or occupational safety engineering and science. Trainingspecialization is achieved through occupational health, environmental scienceand engineering, health and social behavior and health policy and managementcourses that offer advanced teachings in safety engineering, ergonomics,biomechanics, behavioral epidemiology and health services research.

Advisement/Mentorship: Trainees are assigned to one of the core orsupporting program faculty for advisement soon after admission to the program.Together with their adviser, a customized curriculum plan is developed based onrequired courses and specific electives. Students will meet periodically withadvisors for the following purposes: to review progress toward satisfactorycompletion of course work (including options for elective courses); to preparefor written exams, to develop research proposals, to access sources for datacollection and management, and to review drafts of papers. Our experience withtraining in other occupational health specialty areas has emphasized that thestudent advisement/mentorship training component for both pre and postdoctoralstudents is critical to the success of the overall training program.

Curriculum content: Course requirements draw from several curriculumsources from within the School of Public Health, as well as M.I.T, and the Division ofEngineering and Applied Sciences at HarvardUniversity. Corerequirements include requirements of the school and specific classes for injuryprevention research. Pre-doctoral students are required to complete a minimumof 40 credits. Twenty of these credits have to be in occupational injuryprevention research with a focus on either occupational safety engineering andscience or occupational injury epidemiology. The other twenty must contain 10in each of two declared minors (e.g, Health Policy and Management or Health andSocial Behavior).

 

Doctoral Curriculum:

The course curriculum for Doctoral training includes the followingcomponents:

1.   Requirements for occupationalinjury prevention research, which include Principles of Epidemiology,Principles of Biostatistics, Multiple Regression Analysis, Human Physiology,Scientific Basis of Occupational Health Regulations, Occupational Safety andInjury Prevention, Work Environment, Risk Assessment, Practice of OccupationalHealth, Principles of Injury Control, Decision Analysis for Health andMedicine, and Research Ethics.  These courses provide a foundation for alltrainees to apply research in injury prevention.

2.   Major concentrationrequirements and electives for occupational safety engineering and science,which include Occupational Biomechanics, Ergonomics/Human Factors, Protectionof Workers from Hazardous Substances, Noise and Vibration, Human FactorsEngineering, Biomechanics and Neural Control of Movement, System Analysis and PhysiologyApplications, and Muscle Reflexes and Locomotion.

3.   Major concentrationrequirements and electives for occupational injury epidemiology, which includeEnvironmental and Occupational Epidemiology, Occupational Injury Epidemiologyand Prevention, Implementing Prevention and Practice of Epidemiology.

4.   Other electives which fulfillthe 40 credit major and minor concentration requirement include Principles ofToxicology, Occupational Health Services Research, Exposure Assessment,Pathophysiology, Statistical Methods for Health Policy and Management, Societyand Health, Psychosocial Theories of Health Behavior, Community InterventionResearch Methods, and Urban Violence in America.

The tables below present a typical course schedule and demonstrate sequencefor completing course work.

Year 1  Fall Semester credits  Year 1   Spring Semester credits
Principles of Biostatistics 5.0 Environmental and Occ Epidemiology 2.5
Principles of Epidemiology 2.5 Occ Safety and Injury Prevention 2.5
Work Environment 2.5 Occ and Environmental Medicine 2.5
Human Physiology 5.0 Principles of Injury Control 2.5
Ergonomics and Human Factors 2.5 Electives 10
Electives 2.5

 

Year 2  Fall Semester credits  Year 2   Spring Semester credits
Elements of Epi Research 2.5 Occ Injury Epidemiology & Prevention 2.5
Scientific Basis of Occ Health Regulations 5.0 Occupational Biomechanics 5.0
Electives 10 Research Ethics 1.25
Electives 8.75

 

Dissertation Research and continued participation in the research seminarsand occupational health grand rounds occupy Years 3 and 4.

Postdoctoral Curriculum:  An assessment of knowledge in occupationalsafety engineering and science and occupational injury epidemiology is made onan individual basis through faculty advisement.  If any knowledge areasthat require increased learning are identified, advisors recommend theappropriate occupational health courses.  To give postdoctoral studentsspecialty training in occupational injury prevention, the five specializedcourses that include Occupational Injury Epidemiology and Prevention, OccupationalSafety and Injury Prevention, Principles of Injury Control, Introduction toHigh Risk Behaviors, and Decision Analysis for Health and Medicine arerequired.

 

We have not requested any funding for the post-doctoral or master’s levelstraining, but we believe they are an important part to our comprehensiveapproach to Occupational Injury Prevention Research Training.  The ERCAdvisory Committee has also strongly recommended a post-doctoral trainingcomponent.  We have successfully secured funding for four postdoctoralfellowship slots via the Liberty Mutual – HSPH Program for Occupational Safetyand Health and these trainees work jointly with HSPH and Liberty MutualInvestigators on collaborative projects.  For example, Dr. Kezhi Jin from Fudan Universityis a postdoctoral fellow in the program.  He has implemented a casecrossover hand injury study in hand surgery clinics in Shanghai and has collected epidemiologicinformation on over 700 hand injury cases.  He has split his time betweenLiberty Mutual and HSPH and has been co-advised by Ted Courtney and DavidLombardi at LibertyMutual and Melissa Perry at HPSH.  He has published a pilot report on thehand injury study (Jin et al., 2007) and is currently preparing the firstdescriptive report of the full study.