Researchers from our Center made it to the cover of the Enviromental Science: Nano

Screen Shot 2014-01-27 at 5.00.42 PM

Phil Demokritou et al. published recently a high impact paper at the Enviromental Science: Nano a new Journal from the Royal Society of Chemistry. Environmental Science: Nano covers the benefits and implications of nano-science and nanotechnology on environmental health and safety, and the sustainable design, development and use of nanotechnologies. This includes design, applications, life cycle implications, characterization in biological and environmental media, environmental and biological interactions and fate, transformations, transport, reactivity, biological uptake and ecotoxicity, and other areas of sustainable nanotechnology, such as interactions with pollutants and remediation of environmental contaminants by nanomaterials.

Our publication fits the objective of the journal and it was selected by the editors as the most innovative research article to decorate the cover of the first issue of the journal. You can find here the abstract of the paper and the link to the publisher. If you have access to the RSC you will be able to access the publications.

Screen Shot 2014-01-27 at 4.31.48 PMAbstract: Airborne pathogens are associated with the spread of infectious diseases and increased morbidity and mortality. Herein we present an emerging chemical free, nanotechnology-based method for airborne pathogen inactivation. This technique is based on transforming atmospheric water vapor into Engineered Water Nano-Structures (EWNS) via electrospray. The generated EWNS possess a unique set of physical, chemical, morphological and biological properties. Their average size is 25 nm and they contain reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. In addition, EWNS are highly electrically charged (10 electrons per particle on average). A link between their electric charge and the reduction of their evaporation rate was illustrated resulting in an extended lifetime (over an hour) at room conditions. Furthermore, it was clearly demonstrated that the EWNS have the ability to interact with and inactivate airborne bacteria. Finally, inhaled EWNS were found to have minimal toxicological effects, as illustrated in an acute in-vivo inhalation study using a mouse model. In conclusion, this novel, chemical free, nanotechnology-based method has the potential to be used in the battle against airborne infectious diseases.