Topic: cancer

Prostate cancer: Clearing up confusion

February 19, 2014 — Lorelei Mucci, associate professor of epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), studies the factors that influence prostate cancer risk and progression. She answers three questions about recent research findings in the field that have generated confusion…

The oddsmaker

[ Spring 2008 ] A math whiz takes on brain cancer, MS, and Alzheimer’s disease.  Rebecca Betensky’s dad worked as a statistician for a global oil company on “credit rating stuff,” she says, so for a long time, she “stayed as far away from…

Where DNA meets daily life

[Fall 2010] The intersection of genes and the environment is the new target of public health research. Red hair is a genetically determined trait. And when redheads with Celtic roots move to sun-drenched countries near the equator, their risk of skin cancer…

Alumni Award of Merit Winners 2009

[Fall 2009] Scientific Pioneers, Inspirational Teachers Call them pioneers for delving into unexplored research areas. Call them conventional-wisdom busters for proving that common health risks can be limited or eliminated. Or call them mentors who challenge students and guide them to be…

Statistics paint a changing picture

Women Breast, cervical, stomach, lung, and colorectal cancers are the most common cancers among women in developing nations. Breast cancer now surpasses cervical cancer as the number one cause of cancer-related deaths in all but the poorest nations of the world. Developing…

Alumni award winners: What we know now

[ Winter 2011] We asked this year’s winners James Dalen, Fernando Guerra, Lynn Rosenberg, and David Schottenfeld: What do you know now about improving the public’s health that you didn’t when you started out in your career? James Dalen, SM '72 “The people are ahead of their doctors.”…

Cancer is on the rise in developing countries

[Fall 2009] by Julio Frenk, MD, MPH, PhD Dean, Harvard School of Public Health While it's well known that cancer is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, what is less recognized and understood is the significant growth of cancer in the developing…

Predicting survival for brain cancer patients

Is it possible to predict survival for patients with oligodendroglioma from aberrations in their DNA? According to a 2006 study by Rebecca Betensky and colleagues, the answer is yes. An analysis of DNA in 93 patients was completed for regions labeled “1p”…

How genes and environmental forces raise cancer risk

[ Fall 2008 ] Monica Ter-Minassian is scouring the genome for time bombs. Using gene-reading technology and analytic techniques, this Harvard School of Public Health doctoral student is on the hunt for subtle variations in human DNA that might help identify the causes of…