Topic: cancer

Coffee: Drink up, but watch the cream and sugar

A new study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers found that coffee consumption lowered women’s risk of type 2 diabetes by eight percent. Men lowered their risk four percent by drinking regular coffee and seven percent for decaf. The findings,…

Harnessing the power of crowds for cancer prevention

Four years ago, HSPH alumnus Eric Ding, SD ’07, a researcher and instructor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, created the Campaign for Cancer Prevention, the first online platform where donors can contribute directly to individual cancer prevention research. Ding was profiled…

Most cancers strike men, but reasons are enigmatic

February 9, 2012 -- It is well known that most cancers strike men more often than women. In many cases these differences can be explained by known risk factors such as smoking, drinking, or occupational hazards. But more than one-third of the cancers…

Much can be done to ease cancer burden in poorer nations

Although more than half of all new cancers and two-thirds of annual cancer deaths worldwide occur in low- and middle-income countries, with the cancer burden disproportionately affecting the poor, a new report offers upbeat, realistic recommendations on ways to alleviate the problem,…

Smokeless tobacco products designed to attract the young

New smokeless tobacco products with slick packaging and candy-like appearance can lure young people and others into smoking, and, despite having lower nicotine levels, still cause cancer and other health risks, says Gregory N. Connolly, professor of the practice of public health and…

TREC center at HSPH tackles obesity, cancer prevention

May 11, 2012 Research has linked obesity with the development and progression of many health problems including multiple forms of cancer. But questions remain about the complex mechanisms by which obesity develops and how it affects cancer risk and survivorship. Now, Harvard…

Aging light fixtures in New York City schools leaking PCBs

Inspections have revealed that elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, are leaking from aging light fixtures in many New York City public schools. HSPH’s Robert Herrick, senior lecturer on industrial hygiene, spoke to the Wall Street Journal about PCBs and their…

Symposium explores cancer stem cells and tumor metabolism

November 16, 2012 -- An emerging area of science is looking at not just how low-dose radiation harms cells, but also how cells respond to deal with this stress—and how science might harness those same mechanisms to benefit human health. On October 26-27,…

Coffee appears to protect against heart failure, skin cancer

Two new studies led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers provide more good news for coffee drinkers. The research links coffee consumption to reduced risk of heart failure and skin cancer. A study led by [[Elizabeth Mostofsky]], research fellow at…

Examining racial disparities in cancer and mortality rates

March 14, 2012 African Americans face higher cancer rates than whites for many types of cancer, but the reasons why are largely unknown. Epidemiologist Lisa Signorello hopes to help explain the disparities in her role as co-principal investigator on a long-term study…