Topic: chronic disease

Prostate cancer: To screen or not to screen?

August 20, 2013 — For the past 25 years, a prostate cancer screening test called Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) has offered the hope of reducing deaths from prostate cancer by catching the disease early when cure is possible. But recent findings have raised…

The staggering toll of noncommunicable diseases

October 29, 2013 — Chronic diseases including heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, are the leading cause of death worldwide, with the burden falling heaviest in low- and middle-income countries. A new article by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers outlines the…

Omega-3s tied to lower risk of irregular heartbeat

People with higher-than-average levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood may be roughly 30 percent less likely than those with the lowest levels to develop atrial fibrillation, according to new Harvard School of Public Health research. Atrial fibrillation is a dangerous…

Prolonged sitting, TV viewing appear to shorten life

Sitting for more than three hours a day may shorten your life by two years, even if you are physically active and don’t smoke, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Pennington Biomedical Research…

Laura Kubzansky recognized for contributions to field

October 30, 2013 — Laura Kubzansky, professor of social and behavioral sciences at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), recently was elected to the American Psychological Association (APA) and the Academy of Behavioral Medicine Research (ABMR). Kubzansky, also director of the Society…

Sleep apnea among health problems hitting the poor hardest

The poor are disproportionately afflicted with a wide range of health problems, including heart disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma, infant mortality, and dental disease. Sleep deficiency and disorders including sleep apnea also are particularly common among minority groups and those from economically…

HIV-infected patients at higher risk of metabolic syndrome

HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of metabolic syndrome, and a new study helps identify patients most in need of interventions to reduce the risk. Metabolic syndrome, a condition characterized by a group of risk factors, including…

Wanted: 100,000 nurses for next generation of landmark study

Researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) are recruiting 100,000 nurses to expand the landmark Nurses’ Health Study. Female RNs, LPNs, and nursing students, ages 20 to 46, who live in the U.S. or Canada are eligible to join. The Nurses’…

Education levels linked to hypertension in African Americans

Education trumps genetics as a predictor of high blood pressure in African Americans, according to a new study led by a Harvard School of Public Health researcher. The findings dispel the widespread belief that West African ancestry is a primary contributor of…