Topic: diabetes

‘Binge-watching’ TV may be harmful to health

Settling into a comfortable chair to “binge-watch” multiple episodes of your favorite TV show for hours may be hazardous to your health over the long-term, according to Lilian Cheung, lecturer and director, health promotion and communication for the Department of Nutrition at…

Endoplasmic reticulum stress

Gökhan S. Hotamisligil, J.S. Simmons Professor of Genetics and Metabolism and Chair, Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, discusses a new Nature study on endoplasmic reticulum stress and its role in obesity. Please click the player icon above to play this podcast in your…

Shrinking the effects of the obesity epidemic

[ Winter 2011] If we can’t stop Americans from getting heavier, can we at least develop drugs that prevent them from getting sick with obesity-related diseases? The research career of Gökhan Hotamisligil, chair of the Harvard School of Public Health Department of Genetics and…

Obesity in China portends a diabetic disaster

[ Spring 2009 ] Like a runaway train, type 2 diabetes is speeding through many rapidly developing countries, including China. Could a seemingly simple change in diet—from white rice to brown rice—slow the spread of this disease? Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) hope…

Low vitamin D levels may increase risk of type 1 diabetes

For immediate release: February 3, 2013 Boston, MA – Having adequate levels of vitamin D during young adulthood may reduce the risk of adult-onset type 1 diabetes by as much as 50%, according to researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH).…

New poll finds diabetes top health concern for Latino families

For immediate release: January 21, 2014 Princeton, N.J. – A new NPR/Robert Wood Johnson Foundation/Harvard School of Public Health poll was released today on the views of Latinos in America about their health and health care, communities, financial situation, and discrimination in…

Muscle training linked with lowered risk of type 2 diabetes

A new Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) study finds that muscle strengthening and conditioning activities—like resistance exercise, yoga, stretching and toning—are associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Following nearly 100,000 women over eight years, Anders Grøntved, visiting researcher…