Topic: epidemiology

Study finds early treatment may delay onset of AIDS

New findings suggest that HIV-infected patients may delay the onset of AIDS by starting drug therapy earlier while their immune systems are stronger. Researchers including Lauren Cain, a research fellow at HSPH, recommend that patients start treatment earlier than current US guidelines…

Omega-3s tied to lower risk of irregular heartbeat

People with higher-than-average levels of omega-3 fatty acids in their blood may be roughly 30 percent less likely than those with the lowest levels to develop atrial fibrillation, according to new Harvard School of Public Health research. Atrial fibrillation is a dangerous…

Chef in school kitchens helps students eat healthier

With one in three U.S. children considered overweight or obese, food served in schools is being scrutinized closely. For many low-income students who eat free breakfasts and lunches at school, the cafeteria offerings may represent more than half of their daily calories.…

Prolonged sitting, TV viewing appear to shorten life

Sitting for more than three hours a day may shorten your life by two years, even if you are physically active and don’t smoke, according to a new study by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Pennington Biomedical Research…

Vitamin A supplement programs improve child survival

Further research needed on more frequent supplementation and alternative dosing approaches, says HSPH’s Fawzi Vitamin A supplementation is an “important child survival initiative,” HSPH Prof. Wafaie Fawzi and doctoral candidate Andrew Thorne-Lyman wrote in the August 25, 2011 British Medical Journal. Their…

Can brown rice slow the spread of type 2 diabetes?

January 3, 2012 The worldwide spike in type 2 diabetes in recent decades has paralleled a shift in diets away from staple foods rich in whole grains to highly refined carbohydrates, such as white rice and refined flours. Now, a group of…

Most cancers strike men, but reasons are enigmatic

February 9, 2012 -- It is well known that most cancers strike men more often than women. In many cases these differences can be explained by known risk factors such as smoking, drinking, or occupational hazards. But more than one-third of the cancers…

Drinking coffee may decrease depression risk in women

A new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers found that, among women, drinking coffee may reduce the risk of depression. The researchers, led by Michel Lucas, research fellow in nutrition, found the risk of depression to be 20%…

Why epidemiologists should get involved with policy

May 13, 2013 -- In 1854, in the midst of a cholera epidemic in Soho, London, English doctor John Snow drew up a map that showed a cluster of cholera cases surrounding a water pump on Broad Street. The pump was removed,…