Topic: genetics

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Probing genes for disease risk

December 5, 2014 -- New research by Alkes Price, associate professor of statistical genetics at Harvard School of Public Health, and colleagues focuses on new approaches to characterizing and identifying genetic factors in complex disease. What’s the basic finding of your new…

Getting a detailed picture of Ebola

The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT is now “the world’s most powerful factory for analyzing genes from people and viruses,” according to an article in the New York Times, published December 1, 2014. The article highlighted the work of Pardis Sabeti,…

New insights into mechanism behind tuberous sclerosis complex tumors

Findings by Harvard School of Public Health’s Brendan Manning, professor of genetics and complex diseases, are providing new insights into tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) — a rare genetic disease that causes the widespread growth of benign tumors — and may ultimately lead…

The ‘incredible possibilities’ of big data

October 27, 2014 -- When Kent Walker’s mother-in-law was diagnosed with a type of brain cancer initially deemed incurable, Walker’s 17-year-old daughter began scouring the Internet for information that might help her grandmother’s cause. She came across an ongoing clinical trial on her…

Cracking Ebola’s genetic code

Pardis Sabeti has been a leader in the effort to analyze Ebola’s genetic code and track its mutations. Sabeti, who is an associate professor in the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health, associate professor, Center for…

Digging for research gold in electronic medical records

September 25, 2014 — For scientists who study rare diseases, hospitals’ vast data banks hold tantalizing potential. Access to anonymized electronic medical records allows researchers to track the progress of a larger group of patients than would be possible in a traditional…

Big data's big visionary

[ Fall 2014 ] As cholera swept through London in the mid-19th century, a physician named John Snow painstakingly drew a paper map indicating clusters of homes where the deadly waterborne infection had struck. In an iconic feat in public health history,…