Topic: healthy eating

Crash course in healthy cooking

The annual “Healthy Kitchens, Healthy Lives—Caring For Our Patients and Ourselves” conference, offered by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and The Culinary Institute of America, provides doctors and other health professionals with the latest in nutrition science as well as hands-on…

Fat in food: not necessarily a bad thing

It’s not a good idea to cut out all fat from the diet because some fats are “good,” says Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) nutrition expert [[Dariush Mozaffarian]]. What’s more, eating some fat can satisfy the appetite longer—which can actually lead…

HSPH experts help U.S. News rank top diets

The nation’s best overall diets for 2013, according to U.S. News & World Report, are the DASH diet, the TLC diet, and the Mayo Clinic diet. The magazine enlisted the help of 22 experts to make their choices, including two from Harvard…

Berries may lower women’s heart attack risk

A new study led by researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and the University of East Anglia finds that women who eat three or more servings of blueberries and strawberries each week may lower their risk of having a heart attack.…

Better diet after heart attack may reduce death risk

Healthy eating after a heart attack appears to significantly lower the risk of death, according to a new Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) study. Examining data from about 4,000 men and women, researchers found that people whose post-heart attack diets improved…

A tireless advocate for the science of healthy eating

The Boston Globe Magazine profiled Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) nutrition expert Walter Willett in the cover story of its July 28, 2013 issue. Willett, Fredrick John Stare Professor of Epidemiology and Nutrition and chair of the Nutrition Department at HSPH,…

Harvard events highlight benefits of Mediterranean diet

Recent events at Harvard highlighted the benefits of the Mediterranean diet, capitalizing on growing interest after a recent study provided strong new evidence of the diet’s ability to reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. An event held Wednesday, April 3…

Study finds Mediterranean diet reduces heart disease risk

Switching to a Mediterranean diet—rich in olive oil, nuts, beans, fish, fruits, vegetables, and wine in moderation—can help prevent about 30% of heart attacks, strokes, and deaths from heart disease in people at high risk compared with those eating a typical low-fat…