Topic: heart disease

Binge drinking linked with higher heart attack risk

People who binge drink are 72% more likely to have a heart attack than those who don’t, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Researchers looked at interview data from nearly 4,000 people across the U.S.…

China considering tobacco tax to reduce smoking deaths

Adding a 50% excise tax onto tobacco products in China – which has the highest number of tobacco users in the world – could significantly reduce smoking-related deaths while generating substantial financial risk protection and poverty alleviation benefits to households, according to…

New model for predicting cardiovascular disease risk worldwide

For immediate release: March 25, 2015 Boston, MA — New research from Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and Imperial College London shows that more people are at high risk of developing fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD) in many developing countries than in developed countries,…

Childhood trauma’s devastating impact on health

Exposure to trauma during childhood can dramatically increase people’s risk for 7 out of 10 of the leading causes of death in the U.S.—including high blood pressure, heart disease, and cancer—and it’s crucial to address this public health crisis, according to Harvard…

Humble peanut appears to offer health benefits of pricier nuts

You don’t have to shell out big bucks to get the health benefits of nuts. The humble peanut—while technically a legume—appears to do just fine in helping to prevent heart disease and in extending life as almonds, walnuts, and other pricier tree…

Eggs, fats, and the new dietary guidelines

A new recommendation that people don’t need to worry how much cholesterol is in their diet, from a panel that recently issued new dietary guidelines, corrects previous advice based on guesswork, according to nutrition expert Walter Willett of Harvard T.H. Chan School…

‘DNA clock’ can help predict lifespan

Scientists have found a biological clock that can provide clues about how long a person might live. The researchers found that people whose biological age was greater than their true age were more likely to die sooner than those whose biological and…

Harvard Public Health Magazine Extra: Social Capital & Health

April 2014 - Roseto, Pennsylvania was settled by Italian immigrants who were found to have astonishingly low rates of heart disease in the 1950s. Ichiro Kawachi, chair of Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health's Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, explains…