Topic: heart disease

Women dismiss heart disease warning signs more than men

Women are more likely than men to dismiss chest pain that signals heart problems and to delay seeking medical help, even though heart disease is a leading cause of death for both women and men, according to a Harvard School of Public…

Instant noodle consumption linked to heart risk in women

Women who consume instant noodles frequently were found to be more likely to have metabolic syndrome—the group of risk factors, including obesity and high blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood sugar, that increase the risk of heart disease and diabetes—according to a new…

High blood pressure top risk factor in heart disease deaths

High blood pressure is the leading risk factor for death from cardiovascular disease (CVD) around the world, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. The report provides a global view of how blood pressure, cholesterol,…

Screening childhood cancer survivors for heart problems

Simulations find improved outcomes but suggest less frequent screening may be as beneficial For immediate release: May 19, 2014 Boston, MA — One of the first studies to analyze the effectiveness of screening survivors of childhood cancer for early signs of impending…

Where's the salt?

[ Spring 2014 ] People across the globe are consuming far more sodium than is healthy, according to a new study led by researchers at Harvard School of Public Health and the University of Cambridge. In 181 of 187 countries (constituting 99.2% of the…

Eating more fiber after heart attack may lengthen life

Heart attack survivors who eat more fiber may live longer, according to a new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. People who ate the most fiber after a heart attack had a 25% lower chance of dying in…

Fats: Controversy and Consensus

Fats have been in the news recently following a paper published in the Annals of Internal Medicine questioning recommendations on limiting saturated fat intake, which was covered by many media outlets, including by New York Times columnist Mark Bittman in a column…

Angry outbursts appear to boost heart attack, stroke risk

People who have angry outbursts appear to be at increased risk of heart attack or stroke, especially within the first two hours of an outburst, according to a study by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and…