Topic: HIV/AIDS

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Student profile: Christina Nieves, SM '14

Q: Why did you choose HSPH? A: I chose HSPH because I wanted to go to a school with a strong epidemiology program and exceptional students and faculty. HSPH is one of the best public health schools in the country and the…

Rethinking HIV prevention

Daniel Halperin, Lecturer on International Health, on why HIV prevention strategies need a fresh look. (May 2008, 18:46) Please click the player icon above to play this podcast in your browser. Alternatively, you may download the podcast in mp3 format by right-clicking…

AIDS in 1982: Buried in the back pages

August, 1982. Robin Herman, who is currently assistant dean for research communications at HSPH, was then a metro reporter for The New York Times. She was assigned to cover a cluster of cases in New York City of a frightening new disease primarily afflicting…

Youth born with HIV appear at increased risk for heart disease

About 50% of adolescents born HIV-positive may be at increased risk for heart disease, including stroke and heart attack, later in life, according to a National Institutes of Health study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers. While previous studies…

TB, HIV targeted by student researchers

February 18, 2014 — When people who have been cured of tuberculosis (TB) re-develop the disease, are they relapsing or fighting a new strain? How often should HIV/AIDS patients be tested to see if antiretroviral treatment is working? These questions are being…

Fighters for equity

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] Tackling two-tier health care With the creation of the Medicare and Medicaid programs in 1965, the United States began its first large-scale experiment with a formal national health system. Almost overnight, it began subsidizing medical care for the…

When infection won't quit

[ Spring/Summer 2010 ] TB, AIDS, and malaria are finding new ways to resist treatment Recent headlines paint an insidious trend in infectious disease. In San Francisco, 60 percent of new HIV infections are drug resistant. In Europe and the U.S., a deadly new form of tuberculosis —…

HIV/AIDS studies in Africa

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] The School’s fieldwork in HIV/AIDS, which has received support from the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the National Institutes of Health, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, NIH, and other private philanthropists, is concentrated in three…

Saving lives by the numbers

In the mid-1980s, HSPH biostatistician Stephen Lagakos enthusiastically chatted up colleagues about a new mode of communicating called email. “He wondered if it would be feasible to set up email among all of us who wanted to exchange ideas about how to prevent and…

Infectious diseases & pandemics

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] Today, noncommunicable diseases account for two-thirds of all deaths globally. But in low-income nations, three largely preventable infectious diseases—lower respiratory infections, diarrheal infections, and HIV/AIDS—are the leading killers, with malaria, tuberculosis, and neonatal infections close behind. And as…