Topic: mental health

Drinking coffee may decrease depression risk in women

A new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers found that, among women, drinking coffee may reduce the risk of depression. The researchers, led by Michel Lucas, research fellow in nutrition, found the risk of depression to be 20%…

Stress plays key role in racial disparities in health

May 2, 2011 -- Despite the widespread belief that racial differences in stress exist and that stress is linked to poor health, relatively few studies have investigated the topic. A new study conducted by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers shows…

Home stress, work stress linked with increased smoking

September 12, 2012 -- According to new research from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), there’s a strong association between work-family conflict and the likelihood of smoking. Candace Nelson, research fellow in the Department of Environmental Health, Lisa Berkman, director of the Harvard Center for…

Searching for answers to causes of childhood depression

February 1, 2012 Over the past decade, scientists have produced a flurry of studies exploring the role of genetic (nature) and environmental factors (nurture) in youth depression, but there has been little consensus on how depression is jointly impacted by specific genes and external…

New study finds stronger link between depression and stroke

Researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) in Boston have published a new meta-analysis in the September 21, 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association that links depression to stroke risk. The…

Take it to heart: Positive emotions may be good for health

August 15, 2011 Negative thinking or depression can adversely affect your health, according to a number of studies. But what about positive emotions? Can they actually make you healthier? Laura Kubzansky thinks they can. Kubzansky, associate professor of society, human development, and…

Secondhand smoke may cause mental health problems in children

Living in a household with secondhand smoke may increase children’s odds of developing certain neurobehavioral disorders, such as learning disabilities and conduct and behavior disorders, by 50%, according to Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) research reported in The Huffington Post. Research…

Panelists examine effects of stress on health at Forum talk

March 8, 2013 -- Most Americans say they have higher stress levels than they believe are healthy, according to the American Psychological Association’s recent Stress in America survey. One in three report living with extreme stress. Such stress can take a big toll…

Satisfaction with daily life may protect against heart disease

Being satisfied with everyday life is more than just a psychological state—it may also be good for the heart, according to a study led by Harvard School of Public Health researchers. The study appeared online July 5, 2011, in the European Heart…

Inflammatory dietary pattern linked to depression among women

November 7, 2013 – Women whose diet includes more foods that trigger inflammation—like sugar-sweetened or diet soft drinks, refined grains, red meat, and margarine—and fewer foods that restrain inflammation—like wine, coffee, olive oil, and green leafy and yellow vegetables—have up to a…