Topic: North America

Questioning the safety and necessity of flame retardants

March 23, 2012 Did you know that your couch most likely contains up to a pound of flame retardants? And that these are toxic chemicals that may cause cancer, harm reproduction, or adversely impact brain development? In a March 6, 2012 talk…

HSPH's John McDonough launches new Boston Globe health blog

In his new blog for Boston.com, “Health Stew,” John McDonough promises everything from soup to nuts on health care policy, politics, nutrition, exercise, and other health-related matters. McDonough, professor of the practice of public health and director of the Center for Public…

HSPH awarded $8 million from EPA for air pollution research

The Harvard School of Public Health was awarded an $8 million grant by the United States Environmental Protection Agency to launch one of four new university-based Clean Air Research Centers. Aiming to advance understanding of the effects of exposure to particulate matter,…

Wanted: 100,000 nurses for next generation of landmark study

Researchers at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) are recruiting 100,000 nurses to expand the landmark Nurses’ Health Study. Female RNs, LPNs, and nursing students, ages 20 to 46, who live in the U.S. or Canada are eligible to join. The Nurses’…

Examining racial disparities in cancer and mortality rates

March 14, 2012 African Americans face higher cancer rates than whites for many types of cancer, but the reasons why are largely unknown. Epidemiologist Lisa Signorello hopes to help explain the disparities in her role as co-principal investigator on a long-term study…

HSPH researchers call new Florida gun law unconstitutional

September 20, 2011 -- Restrictions on physician-patient conversations could threaten public health A new Florida law aimed at preventing health care practitioners from asking patients whether guns are stored safely in their homes “sets a dangerous precedent” by limiting patient-physician discussions and could…

Education levels linked to hypertension in African Americans

Education trumps genetics as a predictor of high blood pressure in African Americans, according to a new study led by a Harvard School of Public Health researcher. The findings dispel the widespread belief that West African ancestry is a primary contributor of…

HSPH healthy pyramid helps guide offerings at Google's cafés

The healthy eating pyramid developed at Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) is front and center in the cafés of one of the world’s most prominent companies: Google. A May 11, 2012 Los Angeles Times article, on Silicon Valley tech companies’ efforts…

Surgery common among elderly Medicare patients at end of life

Nearly one-third of elderly Americans covered by Medicare have surgery in their last year of life—especially in the last month or final week of life—that often is unnecessary, unwanted by the patient, and may be influenced by financial interests of the health…