Topic: North America

ACA waiver could be a ‘game-changer’

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is a “treasure chest of [health] policy innovations,” writes HSPH’s John McDonough in an article for the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law (JHPPL). These innovations are largely unknown, overlooked by greater attention to other aspects of…

Survey explores communication during West Virginia water crisis

Elena Savoia, research scientist in the Department of Biostatistics and deputy director of the HSPH Preparedness and Emergency Response Learning Center, was recently interviewed on WOWK-TV in Huntington, West Virginia about crisis communication around the state’s winter 2014 water crisis, in which…

Harvard Public Health Magazine Extra: Social Capital & Health

April 2014 - Roseto, Pennsylvania was settled by Italian immigrants who were found to have astonishingly low rates of heart disease in the 1950s. Ichiro Kawachi, chair of HSPH's Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, explains why Roseto is a cautionary tale…

The provocative pragmatist

[ Spring 2014 ] With a mixture of research, persuasion, and social media moxie, Ashish Jha seeks to drive health care improvements Several years ago, Ashish Jha got the call that middle-aged children dread. His mother was on the phone from New Jersey. His…

The hidden health costs of the Great Recession

What is the total price tag for the Great Recession? Almost five years after the official end of the worst downturn since the Great Depression, there is still no clear answer. What we do know is this: A full accounting must reflect…

Blood pressure may rise in neighbors of foreclosed homes

Neighbors of foreclosed homes may face an elevated risk of high blood pressure, according to findings by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers and colleagues. A study of 1,750 Massachusetts residents participating in the long-running Framingham Heart Study from 1987 through…

Improving health for people with disabilities

May 9, 2014 —The phone call from Ghana clinched Asare Christian’s career path. His grandmother was exhibiting sudden, puzzling symptoms including loss of balance, coordination, and bladder function. To Christian, who was learning about brain injury in his clinical rotation in rehabilitation…

Leaders share universal health care experiences

A natural disaster or a significant shift in a nation’s political leanings are among the forces that can spur countries to adopt universal health care (UHC), according to a panel of experts convened by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) to discuss…

Bringing single-payer health care to Vermont

Vermont faces big challenges as it plans to institute the nation’s first and only single-payer health care system by 2017. An April 9, 2014 Vox.com article about Vermont’s experience exploring how best to structure the government-run plan—and how to pay for it—included…

Cure for ‘silent killer’ remains elusive

April 30, 2014 — Barbara Burleigh, associate professor of immunology and infectious diseases, studies Chagas disease, a leading cause of infectious heart failure. The disease is a major health and economic burden in Latin America, where it’s endemic, with roughly 8 million…