Topic: nutrition

Mother's trans fat consumption linked to baby's size

A new study by Harvard School of Public Health researchers and colleagues found that women who ate more food containing trans fats, such as fried foods and baked goods, gave birth to larger babies. The study will appear in the November 2011…

Can brown rice slow the spread of type 2 diabetes?

January 3, 2012 The worldwide spike in type 2 diabetes in recent decades has paralleled a shift in diets away from staple foods rich in whole grains to highly refined carbohydrates, such as white rice and refined flours. Now, a group of…

Drinking coffee may decrease depression risk in women

A new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers found that, among women, drinking coffee may reduce the risk of depression. The researchers, led by Michel Lucas, research fellow in nutrition, found the risk of depression to be 20%…

Biking on cycle tracks safer than cycling in the road

A new study led by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers shows bicycle riders have fewer injuries when they ride on cycle tracks-- physically separated bicycle-exclusive paths along roads--than in the road. The study, published online Feb. 9, 2011 in Injury…

Food marketing can distort portion size perceptions

March 28, 2012 Think you know how many calories you get when you order a "low-fat" sub? Or how many ounces are in the soda you guzzle down at the movies? Whatever you think you know, you’re likely wrong, according to Pierre…

Eating berries may protect against Parkinson's disease

Men and women who regularly eat berries may reduce their risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, according to a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH). The researchers, led by Xiang Gao, research scientist in HSPH’s Department of Nutrition, believe the…

Nutrition news: Factors linked to long-term weight gain

Foods are not created equal when it comes to what foods are likely to pack on pounds over time, Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers report. In a study published June 23, 2011, in the New England Journal of Medicine looking…