Topic: nutrition

Bee decline could increase malnutrition and disease risk

More than half of people living in four of the world’s poorest countries could be newly at risk for malnutrition if bees and other pollinating animals continue to decline, according to a new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of…

New molecular target identified for treating cerebral malaria

For immediate release: January 30, 2015 Boston, MA – A drug already approved for treating other diseases may be useful as a treatment for cerebral malaria, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health. They discovered a novel link between…

Staying Active

In addition to eating high-quality foods, physical activity can help you reach and maintain a healthy weight. Getting regular physical activity is one of the best things you can do for your health. It lowers the risk of heart disease, diabetes, stroke,…

A healthy breakfast essential to losing weight

If you want to lose weight or maintain a proper weight, eat a healthy breakfast, Eric Rimm, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, advised in the Boston Globe January 13, 2015. Breakfast should make up…

Breakfast and heart disease risk

July 2013 -- A new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researchers Leah Cahill and Eric Rimm finds that skipping breakfast led to a 27% increase in coronary heart disease risk among men. (Conversations on Public Health podcast series,…

More whole grains linked with lower mortality

For immediate release: January 5, 2015 Boston, MA -- Eating more whole grains is associated with up to 15% lower mortality—particularly cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related mortality, according to a large new long-term study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study also found that bran,…

Weight training appears key to controlling belly fat

For immediate release: December 22, 2014 Boston, MA — Healthy men who did twenty minutes of daily weight training had less of an increase in age-related abdominal fat compared with men who spent the same amount of time doing aerobic activities, according…

Obesity linked to aggressive prostate cancer

A new report that analyzed the health histories of 9.8 million men finds strong evidence that excess body fat may increase advanced prostate cancer risk. The report, Diet, Nutrition, Physical Activity and Prostate Cancer, was released by the American Institute for Cancer…

Swapping veggies for meat a healthier choice

Numerous studies since the 1960s have linked consumption of red meat to an increased risk of breast and colon cancer, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and other conditions, Walter Willett, Fredrick John Stare professor of epidemiology and nutrition and chair of the…