Topic: occupational health

Solvent exposure may cause long-term brain damage

Workers exposed to solvents may continue to experience cognitive difficulties decades later, according to new findings by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) researchers and colleagues. In a study of retired male utility workers, the researchers found evidence of damage to thinking…

Keeping workers safe from health hazards on the job

September 16, 2013 -- Harvard School of Public Health’s Education and Research Center (ERC) for Occupational Safety and Health has been awarded a five-year, $1.8 million per year grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Institute for Occupational Safety…

Reducing risk of head and neck pain from tablet computer use

January 26, 2012 -- People worldwide have been buying up tablet computers—small, thin devices such as Apple’s iPad--in droves, partly because of their ease of use and portability. However, little is known about the potential for tablet users to experience the same kinds…

Construction workers struggle with pain, stress from injuries

October 28, 2013 – Construction workers are frequently stressed about work-related injuries and pain and often fail to seek help, putting themselves at risk for more injuries and mental health issues, including depression, anxiety, and even suicide, according to a new study…

2008 Alumni Award of Merit winners

[ Fall 2008 ] Standouts in public health tend to view big problems as boulders that must be rolled uphill, however steep those hills might be. This year’s recipients of the Alumni Award of Merit have each approached serious health threats to huge numbers…

The Triangle Factory fire and workplace safety regulations

On the 100th anniversary of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire in New York City, Elkan Blout Professor of Environmental Genetics David Christiani talks about how the tragedy mobilized government officials and the public to strengthen workplace safety regulations. He also talks about Alice Hamilton,…

Harvard's first lady

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] By the time Alice Hamilton joined Harvard’s faculty in 1919, she was already one of the nation’s pre-eminent researchers in the field of occupational health. Her tenacious methods were legendary—in her study of workers suffering from diseases like…

Protecting workers’ health

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] Throughout the School’s history, researchers have sought to keep workers safe and workplaces healthy. From pioneering efforts exposing the adverse effects of early-20th-century factory life to current studies on the heart health of firefighters, HSPH researchers have uncovered…

Deadly occupation, forged report

[Fall 2013 Centennial issue] In the early 1920s, workers at U.S. Radium Corporation’s luminous watch dial factory were mysteriously falling ill and dying. Eager to halt a mounting scandal, company President Arthur Roeder contacted industrial hygiene expert Cecil Drinker to investigate. Drinker,…