Hummus

Recipe Courtesy of Chef Joyce Goldstein

Yield: 8 portions

Chickpeas (chick-pea-in-bowl.jpg)

Hummus is a classic bean spread, popular as a mezze (appetizer) in Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and Israel. Classic hummus doesn’t contain the ingredients such as roasted peppers, spinach, artichokes, or sun-dried tomatoes seen in many supermarket brands, but if you want to add any of these to your hummus, have fun being creative! You can serve hummus with pita bread or with cucumbers, radishes, carrots, and bell peppers.

  • 1 ¾ cup (one 15-ounce can) chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 1 cup sesame tahini (also called sesame butter)
  • ½ cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely minced
  • 1 to 2 tablespoons cold water
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper, freshly ground
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne red pepper (optional)
  • ½ teaspoon cumin, ground (optional)

Optional garnishes:

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons flat leaf parsley, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons pomegranate seeds
  • ½ teaspoon cumin, ground
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper or Aleppo pepper

In a food processor combine the tahini, lemon juice, garlic, water, salt, pepper, and optional spices, if desired. Pulse to combine.

Add the chickpeas and process until smooth. You may need to add more water if the consistency is too thick. Add enough cold water to achieve a spreadable consistency.

When you’re ready to serve, spoon the hummus onto a shallow plate. (If you make hummus ahead of time, the mixture will thicken as it stands. You may need to thin it with water. ) Smooth it with a spoon or spatula. If desired, sprinkle with olive oil, parsley, or other optional garnishes listed above.

Nutritional information per serving (1/8th of recipe): 

Calories: 245 ⁄ Protein: 8 g ⁄ Carbohydrate:  20 g ⁄ Fiber: 4 g ⁄ Sodium: 265 mg
Saturated fat: 2 g ⁄ Polyunsaturated fat: 7 g ⁄ Monounsaturated fat: 6 g
Trans fat: 0 g ⁄ Cholesterol: 0 mg

Copyright © Joyce Goldstein

Terms of Use

The aim of the Harvard School of Public Health Nutrition Source is to provide timely information on diet and nutrition for clinicians, allied health professionals, and the public. The contents of this Web site are not intended to offer personal medical advice. You should seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this Web site. The information does not mention brand names, nor does it endorse any particular products.