Mushroom Stroganoff

Recipe courtesy of Joyce Goldstein

mushroomsServes 4

This recipe uses umami-rich mushrooms in place of meat to create a rich, savory sauce that can be served with whole wheat noodles, wild rice pilaf, barley pilaf, or farro. If you make your own vegetable stock, you can control the amount of salt you add to it. If you buy vegetable stock, compare brands to find the one with the least amount of sodium.

  • 4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 cups white onions, sliced
  • 1 tablespoon sweet paprika
  • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper or hot paprika
  • 1 teaspoon finely grated lemon peel
  • 1 pound mushrooms (either button, cremini, chanterelles, or a combination of these), sliced
  • 1 cup vegetable stock
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • ½ teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • ½ cup plain Greek yogurt mixed with 1 tablespoon flour
  • 2 tablespoons fresh dill, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons flat leaf parsley, chopped

Heat the oil in a large sauté pan and add the onions. Sauté until the onions are tender and starting to take on some color, about 15 minutes. Stir in the paprika, cayenne, lemon zest, and then add the sliced mushrooms and ½ cup of stock or a bit more.

Stirring occasionally, cook briskly for about 10 minutes until reduced. Season with salt and pepper. Remove the pan from the heat, rest for about 2 minutes and then swirl in the yogurt.

Sprinkle with chopped dill or parsley, and serve with whole wheat noodles, wild rice pilaf, barley pilaf, or farro.

Nutritional information per serving:

Calories: 215 ⁄ Protein: 6 g ⁄ Carbohydrate: 17 g ⁄ Fiber: 4 g ⁄ Sodium: 430 mg ⁄ Potassium: 650 mg
Saturated fat: 2.5 g ⁄ Polyunsaturated fat: 2 g ⁄ Monounsaturated fat: 10 g ⁄
Trans fat: 0 g ⁄ Cholesterol: 4 mg

Find more delicious recipes that spare the salt from The Culinary Institute of America and the Harvard School of Public Health.

Copyright © Joyce Goldstein

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