HARVARD CENTER FOR POPULATION
AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

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EVENTS

Upcoming Events


Aging Seminar Series / Work in Progress Luncheons / Workshops and Conferences

*******The deadline for workshop applications is now closed*******

Open to: Harvard faculty members
Deadline: February 28, 2013

Overview: These small, interactive meetings (around 30 people) should focus on issues in the demography and economics of aging and relate to a PGDA theme. Their aim is to explore emerging issues in the field of aging. We expect the workshops to have wide participation from across Harvard and involve senior scientists as well as young, independent researchers. A number of external experts can also be invited.

Parameters: PGDA will consider funding up to $10,000 to cover the costs of convening
these meetings (i.e. food and beverage, travel for speakers, etc). Conveners must be Harvard
faculty members conducting age-related research. Workshops will usually take place
at the Pop Center (9 Bow Street in Harvard Square), though hosting at another Harvard location may be proposed. PGDA will actively promote and advertise these workshops. Administrative and logistical support will also be available.

All proposals should contain the information listed below and be submitted to Maria Joy, PGDA Program Coordinator, at mjoy@hsph.harvard.edu. We will be back in touch with a decision by early March. This is a competitive process so all proposals may not be funded, or may not be funded at the budget level requested. Please note that faculty applying for workshop funding from the Pop Center may also be considered for PGDA funding. Please contact Maria Joy with questions.

Please complete the following information on your proposal:

• Name of applicant(s) [must be Harvard faculty]
• Title of applicant
• Department and school of applicant
• Email address of applicant
• Relevant PGDA theme for proposed workshop:
- Measurement of the global pattern of disease, mortality, and morbidity in aging populations
- Social determinants of population health and aging
- Economics of Medicare
- Demographic and economic consequences of global aging
- Migration and aging
• Please briefly describe the goals of the proposed workshop
• Please provide a brief description (one paragraph) of the workshop and include potential external speakers and Harvard faculty (please provide names and affiliated schools)
• What target audience would you like to see attend the workshop?
• In what time period would you like to host the workshop?
• Budget (please provide a detailed budget up to $10,000)
• What consequences do you foresee flowing from the workshop (grant applications, etc)?

 

 

PAST WORKSHOPS & CONFERENCES

 

The Economics of Population Aging in China and India - March 7-8, 2013

Location: Stanford University, Encina Hall

Panelists:

Jinkook Lee - RAND Corporation
David Weir - University of Michigan
Mark E. McGovern - Harvard University
Ajay Mahal - Monash University, Australia
David Bloom - Harvard University
Indrani Gupta - Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi, India
Ang Sun - Renmin University, China
Anjini Kochar - Stanford University
Kim Babiarz - Stanford University
Jeremy Goldhaber-Fiebert - Stanford University
Wang Feng - Brookings - Tsinghua

Overview:

China and India are, by far, the two most populous countries in the world. As a result of declining fertility, increasing life expectancy, and the progression of large cohorts to the older ages, both of them, like all other countries, have aging populations. However, China’s total fertility rate began to fall much earlier and faster than India’s, and its life expectancy began to rise much earlier. As a result, China is aging rapidly, with the ratio of working-age to dependent population set to decline. In India, the ratio is still rising.

For a variety of reasons that encompass but also extend beyond demographic factors, both countries have experienced rapid economic growth, though China’s rate has been much higher than India’s. With the two populations aging at different rates, the relative economic growth paths of the two countries may also change.

This conference features research papers addressing the economic determinants or consequences of population aging in China or India. Some focus on China or India; some compare the two. A lunchtime panel will feature roundtable discussion of invited researchers.

The conference is sponsored by the Program on the Global Demography of Aging, the South Asia Initiative, the Asia Center, the Harvard-Yenching Institute, the Harvard China Fund, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs (all at Harvard University), and the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center (at Stanford University).

 

 

Advancing the Research Infrastructure for Cross-National Comparative Research on Social Inequalities in Health* - October 23, 2012

Exploratory Workshop Date: Tuesday, October 23, 2012
Time: 9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Location: Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, 9 Bow Street, Cambridge

Overview and goals of the workshop:

The goal of the workshop is to explore the feasibility of launching a “Comparative Health Inequality Study” (CHIS).  Currently, cross-national comparative research on inequalities in health is severely hindered by a lack of comparable, individual-level data on population health.  In contrast, research on the macro-level, institutional determinants of income inequality has progressed quite far, largely due to the high-quality, comparable, individual-level, remote-access data provided by the Luxembourg Income Study (now known as LIS).

Can we imagine an analogous infrastructure for cross-nationally comparable health data?  The development of such an infrastructure faces several challenges.  Thus, the goals of the workshop are to:

(1) consider conceptual problems in developing comparable measures of health,
(2) identify ethical challenges created by the dissemination of sensitive data,
(3) identify barriers to procuring individual-level survey data, and
(4) extend the lessons learned by the LIS to the domain of population health.

Faculty Convener:
Jason Beckfield, Professor of Sociology, Harvard University

Agenda

9:30-10:00       Coffee and welcome

10:00-10:30     The need for a comparative health inequality study, presented by Jason Beckfield, Professor of Sociology, Department of Sociology, Harvard

10:30-11:00     Goals for the workshop (Beckfield)

11:00-12:00     Overview of the LIS: history, objectives, funding, presented by Janet Gornick, Professor of Political Science and Sociology at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) and Director of the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) ) Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg

12:00-1:00       Lunch

1:00-2:00         Research Core of the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, presented by Jocelyn Finlay, Research Core Director, Harvard Center for the Population and Development Studies

2:00-2:30         The EU Working Group on Socioeconomic Inequalities in Health, presented by Johan Mackenbach, Department Chair and Professor of Public Health, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, the Netherlands

2:30-3:00         Possible Sources of Data, presented by Jason Beckfield

3:00-3:30         How the LIS works, presented by Thierry Kruten, Director of Operations and IT Director, Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg

3:30-5:00         Marching Orders, presented by Jason Beckfield

Speakers and participants:

Jocelyn Finlay, Research Associate in Global Health and Population and Director of the Research core at the Center for Population Research and Development Studies, Harvard School of Public Health
Janet Gornick, Professor of Political Science and Sociology and Director, Luxembourg Income Study Center, City University of New York Graduate Center
Nancy Krieger, Professor of Society, Human Development and Health, Harvard School of Public Health
Thierry Kruten, Director of Operations and IT Director, Luxembourg Income Study Center
Johan Mackenbach, Professor of Public Health and Chair, Department of Public Health, Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, the Netherlands

*Co-sponsored by Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies

 

Is There Compression of Morbidity? Evidence and Consequences* - September 28, 2012

Exploratory Workshop Date: Friday, September 28, 2012
Time: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Location: Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, 9 Bow Street, Cambridge

Overview and goals of the workshop:

The workshop will gather leading investigators from different disciplines to provide evidence of whether recent increases in survival and life expectancy are accompanied by more years in good health and thus, leading to a compression of morbidity. The compression of morbidity should indicate a reduction in the innate morbidity occurring within people in a population rather than an improvement in environmental conditions external to the individuals living in the environment. For example, a decline in disability may reflect the provision of electric chairs but it would be the related reduction in the ability to walk that we would want to investigate to determine whether there has been compression of morbidity.

The objectives of the workshop include:

1. Bring together a small group of experts working on compression of morbidity to present the state of the evidence on the topic from various disciplinary perspectives including demography, economics, and epidemiology. In particular, we will explore: (a) different frameworks and measures for analyzing trends in life expectancy, disability and morbidity, (b) economic and public health implications of compression/expansion of morbidity, (c) theoretical and empirical questions that would be useful to address, and (d) what data are or are not available to answer these questions.

2. Elaborate a more accurate description to the compression of morbidity besides highlighting way forward for research and policy.

Faculty Conveners:
Subu Subramanian, PhD, Professor of Population Health and Geography, HSPH and
Hiram Beltran-Sanchez, PhD, David E. Bell Postdoctoral Fellow, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies

Agenda:

9:00-9:30AM Coffee

9:30-10:00 Welcome, Workshop objectives and Introductions

10:00-11:00 – “Trends in Disability and Related Conditions Among the 40 and Over Population”  presented by Linda G. Martin, Senior Fellow at the RAND Corporation

11:00-12:00 – “Changes Over Time in the Morbidity Process” presented by Eileen Crimmins, Edna M. Jones Professor, University of Southern California

12:00-1:00 Lunch

1:00-2:00PM – “Health Declines at Older Ages” presented by David Cutler, Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics, and Professor in the Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard University

2:00-3:00 – “Global Patterns and Changes in Healthy Life Expectancy” presented by Joshua Salomon, Professor of Global Health, Harvard School of Public Health

3:00-3:30 Break

3:30-4:30 “Two Americas at the Dawn of the Aging Revolution” presented by S. Jay Olshansky, Professor in the School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago

4:30-5:00 Open discussion led by David Canning, Richard Saltonstall Professor of Population Sciences and Professor of Economics and International Health, Harvard School of Public Healthh

5:00-5:15 Closing led by SV (Subu) Subramanian, Professor of Population Health and Geography, Harvard School of Public Health

Participants:
David Canning, Richard Saltonstall Professor of Population Sciences, Harvard School of Public Health
Eileen M. Crimmins, Edna M. Jones Professor & AARP Chair in Gerontology, School of Gerontology, USC
David Cutler, Otto Eckstein Professor of Applied Economics, Harvard University
Linda G. Martin, Senior Fellow, RAND Corporation (Washington, D.C.)
S. Jay Olshansky, Professor of Epidemiology, University of Illinois at Chicago School of Public Health
Joshua Salomon, Professor of Global Health, Department of Global Health and Population, HSPH

*Co-sponsored by Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies

 

Universal Health Coverage: Challenges, Measurements and Evaluation Strategies* - September 13, 2012

Exploratory Workshop Date: Thursday, September 13, 2012
Time: 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Location: Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, 9 Bow Street, Cambridge

Overview and goals of the workshop: 

The workshop is dedicated to promoting scientific discussion on universal health coverage in resource-poor settings in terms of its challenges, measurements, and evaluation strategies. It will have three themes: (1) global progress in achieving universal health coverage, (2) measurement errors in estimating universal financial risk protection, and (3) performance evaluation of universal health care. Presentations on the first theme will provide information on global progress, country practices and challenges in achieving universal health coverage. Presentations on the second theme will focus on methodological issues in measuring the progress of universal health coverage, particularly on the coverage of financial risk. The effect of non-sampling errors, resulting from household survey design, on estimating universal financial risk protection will be explored. The third theme will cover the methods that can be used to evaluate the efficiency of a universal health coverage program.

Faculty Convener:
Chunling Lu, PhD, Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and in Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School.

Agenda
9:00-9:20: Introduction

9:30-11:00: “Global perspective: strategies, practices, and challenges in achieving universal health coverage” presented by Tessa Tan-Torres Edejer, Coordinator, Unit of Costs, Effectiveness, Expenditure and Priority Setting, Department of Health Systems Financing in the Cluster on Health Systems and Services at the World Health Organization

11:00-11:10: Break

11:10-12:40: “Country case: strategies, practices, and challenges in achieving universal health coverage” presented by Dr. Agnes Binagwaho, Minister of Health, Rwanda (via videoconference)

12:40-1:30: Lunch

1:30-3:00: “Measuring universal financial risk protection” presented by Dr. Chunling Lu, Assistant Professor of Global Health and Social Medicine, Brigham & Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School

3:00-3:15: Break

3:15-4:45: “Evaluation of universal health coverage” presented by Peter Smith, Professor of Health Policy and co-director of the Centre for Health Policy in the Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London

4:45-5:00: Conclusion

Speakers and participants:

Chunling Lu, PhD, Assistant Professor, Harvard Medical School
Agnes Binagwaho, MD, Minister of Health in Rwanda and Senior Lecturer of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine, Harvard Medical School (via videoconference)
Tessa Tan-Torres Edejer, MD, Coordinator, Unit of Costs, Effectiveness, Expenditure and Priority Setting, Department of Health Systems Financing in the Cluster on Health Systems and Services at the World Health Organization
Peter Smith, Professor of Health Policy and co-director of the Centre for Health Policy in the Institute of Global Health Innovation, Imperial College London

*Co-sponsored by Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies

 

The Social, Economic and Health Consequences of Natural Disasters* - June 11, 2012

Exploratory Workshop Date: Monday, June 11, 2012
Time: 9:00 AM – 3:00 PM (at 3:00 PM, the project PIs will go into a closed meeting)
Location: Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, 9 Bow Street, Cambridge

Overview and goals of the workshop:

Studies of natural disasters generally have four major shortcomings.  First, most studies have no pre-disaster baseline data and therefore it is difficult to establish that the disaster is the cause of some of the measured consequences such as mental and physical health outcomes.  Second, most studies focus on the immediate aftermath of the disaster and very few studies follow people over time to study the longitudinal patters of recovery and vulnerability.  Third, most studies focus on a single consequence of the disaster individually, often reflecting disciplinary boundaries.  For instance, studies of mental health after a disaster often do not look at social, economic and geographic consequences.  Finally, disasters are almost never studied comparatively so that findings are limited to the society or culture in which it occurred.

The Hurricane Katrina longitudinal study (Waters, Paxson, Fussell and Rhodes, PIs) and the Indonesian Tsunami longitudinal study (Frankenberg and Duncan, PIs) are exceptions to this general pattern.  This workshop will bring together the researchers to discuss what we have learned from these ongoing studies and to discuss possible ways to harmonize data and measures going forward.

Faculty Convener

Mary C. Waters, PhD, M.E. Zukerman Professor of Sociology, Harvard

Agenda

9:00-9:15: Introduction and Welcome
9:15-11:00:  Presentations – STAR Project: Study of the Aftermath and Recovery in Sumatra, Indonesia and PKSRR Project: Post Katrina Study of Resilience and Recovery
11:00-11:30: Discussion – Incorporating Pre-Disaster Data into Analyses: What difference does it make
11:30-12:00: Tracking, Attrition, and Representativeness
12:00-12:30: Mixed Methods Approaches
12:30-1:30: Lunch
1:30-3:00:  Defining and Measuring Recovery and Resilience in the Long Term: Challenges and opportunities in longitudinal studies?
3:00-4:00: Closed meeting for PIs

Speakers and participants

Mary Waters, PhD, Sociologist, Harvard university
Jean Rhodes, PhD, Psychologist, University of Massachusetts Boston
Elizabeth Fussell, PHD, Sociologist, Washington State University
Jordan Smoller, MD, Psychiatrist, Harvard Medical School
Elizabeth Frankenberg, PhD, Sociologist, Duke University
Duncan Thomas, PhD, Economist, Duke University
Amar Hamoudi, PhD, Economist, Duke University
Jenna Nobles, PhD, Demographer, University of Wisconsin Madison
Sarah Lowe, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Massachusetts Boston
Christian Chan, PhD, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Massachusetts Boston

*Co-sponsored by Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies

 

Health Systems, Population Health, and Development in China and India - March 25, 2006
Harvard Business School and Harvard School of Public Health

Date: Saturday, March 25, 2006
Time: 8:30 - 4:00 PM
Location: Sky Lounge of the ITC Maurya Sheraton Hotel and Towers

Diplomatic Enclave, Sadar Patel Marg
New Delhi 110 021

The purpose of the seminar is to examine the links between health, population, and development in China and India -- considered separately and in comparison with each other.  The stirring changes that China and India are experiencing are, quite obviously, the object of much attention these days, in the popular press as well as among development specialists.  We have chosen to focus on health as an important topic in itself, as a window onto understanding how China and India have been changing, and as a way of thinking about the possibility of health improvements further speeding economic growth and poverty reduction in the two countries.

This event is sponsored by the Program on the Global Demography of Aging (with funds from grant number: 5 P30 AG024409 from the National Institute on Aging), the Harvard Asia Center, The South Asia Initiative at Harvard and the Thierry Porte Endowment Fund.

Agenda

Background Papers

 

AGENDA

Health Systems, Population Health, and Development in China and India

8:30 Welcome and opening comments. Why are Chinese healthier than Indians? (PPT)Tarun Khanna and David Bloom

9:00 David Bloom, David Canning, Linlin Wu, Yuanli Liu, Ajay Mahal and Winnie Yip, “Demographic Change and Economic Growth: Comparing China and India” (PDF)

9:30 Nazmul Chaudhury, , Michael Kremer, Karthik Muralidharan, and F. Halsey Rogers, “Public Health Care Provider Absence in India” (PDF) (PPT)

10:00 Coffee break

10:15 Yasheng Huang, “Private Sector Development and Health Care Contributions in China”

10:45 Abhijit Banerjee, “Randomized Experiments in Studying Health Interventions” (PDF)

11:15 Remarks by Montek Ahluwalia, Deputy Chairman, Planning Commission of India

11:45 Lunch: Dr Devi Shetty, “Year 2010 – India, World’s Largest Mass Healthcare Provider” (PPT)

12:45 Peter Berman, “Unintended Convergence: How India and China Set Out to Create State Run Health Care and Created Private for Profit Health Care Systems” (PDF) (PPT)

1:15 E. Somanathan, “The Demand for Safe Water: Awareness and Wealth Effects Compared” Paper 1, Paper 2 (PDF)

1:45 Coffee break

2:00 Tony Saich, “The Policy Challenge of Dealing with HIV/AIDS in China” (PDF)

2:30 Wrap-up panel of academic commentators moderated by Lawrence Summers, President, Harvard University

  • Abhijit Banerjee, MIT
  • Pranab Bardhan, University of California, Berkeley
  • T. N. Srinivasan, Yale University

3:00 Business leader remarks moderated by Lawrence Summers, President, Harvard University

  • Rajat Gupta, McKinsey and Company (Ex Managing Partner)

3:30 Audience Discussion

4:00 Closing

 

 

 

BACKGROUND PAPERS

The Population Superpowers: Economic Prospects in India and China (PPT)
David Bloom (and David Canning), Harvard School of Public Health

Privatization and Its Discontents — The Evolving Chinese Health Care System (PDF)
David Blumenthal and William Hsiao, Harvard School of Public Health

Application to Urban Health Sector Reforms in China (PDF)
Karen Eggleston, Tufts University and Winnie Yip, Harvard School of Public Health

Disparity in Health: The Underbelly of China’s Economic Development (PDF)
William C. Hsiao, Harvard School of Public Health

What is Wrong with China’s Health System? (PDF)
Yuanli Liu, Harvard School of Public Health

Adverse Selection in a Voluntary-Based RMHC Insurance Scheme
in Rural China
(PDF)
Hong Wang, Licheng Zhang, Winnie Yip, William Hsiao

Community-based Health Insurance in Poor Rural China: the Distribution of Net Benefits (PDF)
Hong Wang et al

Addressing Government and Market Failures with Payment Incentives: Hospital Reimbursement Reform in Hainan, China (PDF)
Winnie Yip, Harvard School of Public Health and Karen Eggleston,Tufts University

Does Social Capital Enhance Health and Well-Being? Evidence from Rural China? (PDF)
Winnie Yip et al

Provider Payment Reform in China: The Case of Hospital Reimbursement in Hainan Province (PDF)
Winnie Yip, Harvard School of Public Health and Karen Eggleston, Tufts University

 

 

 

Population Aging and Economic Growth - May 18-19, 2007

Sponsored by the Program on the Global Demography of Aging (with funds from grant number: 5 P30 AG024409 from the National Institute on Aging)

Program on the Global Demography of Aging
Location: 104 Mount Auburn Street, Cambridge, MA
Email: pgda_high@harvard.edu
Phone: +1 617-495-7927
Fax: + 1 617-495-8231

The world is entering substantially uncharted waters in terms of the size of elderly populations. The shift in age structure is the result of several phenomena: recent declines in fertility rates, recent increases in life expectancy, and the dynamic evolution resulting from past variations in birth and death rates. The number of people over the age of 60 is expected to reach 1 billion by 2020 and almost 2 billion by 2050 (representing 22 percent of the world’s population). The proportion of individuals aged 80 or over is projected to rise from 1 percent to 4 percent of the global population by 2050.

There is also mounting evidence that the elderly are healthier than before. In a phenomenon referred to by demographers and health specialists as the “compression of morbidity”, the length of healthy old-age appears to be increasing. Part of this increase is due to increases in the length of life, and part to even greater increases in the length of life free of chronic illness. The net effect is a decline in the lifetime burden of illness (as measured in years unwell).

Since different age groups have different economic needs and productive capacities, a country's economic characteristics may be expected to change as its population ages. A standard approach to assessing these changes is to assume constant age-specific behavior with respect to earnings, employment, and savings, and to assess the implications of changes in the relative size of different age groups for these fundamental contributors to economic growth. However, the simple application of this approach would likely be misleading. First, there will be general equilibrium feedback effects through wages and prices that will change behavior. Second, behavioral changes induced by changing expectations about the life cycle, involving labor supply and savings, are likely to influence the economic consequences of aging. Third, aging and macroeconomic performance are mediated by the institutional context (e.g., retirement policy, pension and health care systems, efficiency of labor and capital markets, and the structure of regional and global economic systems). The policy environment may itself be influenced by population aging, depending on the voting and other political behavior of an aging electorate – whose needs and interests differ from those of younger people.

Population aging may be expected to require increased current savings to finance more person-years spent living in partial or full retirement (especially given public and private retirement incentives in many countries). The expected savings boost will likely affect financial markets, rates of return, and thereby investment. Net transfers across generations may also adjust. International capital flows may also be affected, especially insofar as different countries’ demographic cycles are out of phase.

The manner in which aging affects savings will depend in part on retirement systems. Actuarially fair systems that do not encourage people to retire before they would otherwise choose to do so may be important in ensuring optimal retirement behavior from a societal point of view.

Population aging will likely cause reductions in aggregate labor supply and will change the composition of the labor force (particularly as measured by worker experience). One might also expect an increase in the general level of wages and a fall in unemployment rates, along with an increase in the demand for labor-intensive foreign goods and certain services (e.g., medical tourism). The prospect of labor shortages may also have large effects on the incentives for education and immigration and the development and reliance on new capital-intensive technologies.

The health and long-term elder care sectors are likely to expand with population aging. The outputs of these sectors are largely non-traded and labor-intensive, and may have a low rate of technical progress. There are accounting as well as economic analysis issues here, particularly in regard to accounting for health care in the national income accounts and measuring technical progress.

Here is a list of papers to be presented at this workshop:

Amaral, Ernesto F., Eduardo Rios-Neto, Daniel S. Hamermesh, and Joseph E. Potter: Age and Education in the Course of Development: Does Composition Matter?

Bloom, David, David Canning, Guenther Fink and Jocelyn Finlay: Demographic Change, Institutional Settings and Labor Supply

Bommier, Antoine: Mortality Decline and Aggregate Capital Accumulation

Feyrer, James: Demographics, Management Quality, and the US Productivity Slowdown

Lee, Ron and Andy Mason: Age, Aging and Economic Growth

Philipson, Tom, Anupam B. Jena, Casey B. Mulligan, and Eric C. Sun: The Value of Life in General Equilibrium

Soares, Rodrigo and Bruno Falcão: The Demographic Transition and the Sexual Division of Labor

Weil, David and Sebnem Kalemli-Ozcan: Mortality Change, the Uncertainty Effect, and Retirement

Weiss, Matthias, Axel Börsch-Supan and Ismail Düzgün: Age and Productivity in Work Teams: Evidence from the Assembly Line

 

 

 

 

 

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