Author Archives: Kayla R Small

Age at Menarche: 50-Year Socioeconomic Trends Among US-Born Black and White Women.

Photo of Nancy KriegerPop Center faculty members Nancy Krieger and Jason Beckfield have published a study analyzing 50 years of data on the age at which US-born Black and White women begin menstruation. Their works shows that trends in age at menarche vary by socioeconomic position (SEP and race/ethnicity) in ways that pose challenges to several leading clinical, public health, and social explanations for timing of menarche.

Impact of family planning on child survival and development

familyPop Center faculty members Gunther Fink and Wafaie Fawzi have published a new study showing that postponing the age of first birth and increasing inter-pregnancy intervals—two outcomes made possible by family planning—have the potential to significantly reduce the prevalence of stunted growth and improve child development in LMICs (low and middle income countries).

Childhood sexual abuse linked to heart disease risk in women

sadRWJF alumna Rebecca Thurston has published a study which reveals that psychosocial stress brought on by early life adversities may have implications for the development of risk factors for heart disease later on. The study results have been reported in multiple media outlets, including US News & World Report.

The Impact of Childhood Social Disadvantage

How does social disadvantage in childhood correlate to cardiometabolic function and chronic disease status 40 years down the line? RWJF alumna Amy Non, along with Pop Center faculty members Ichiro Kawachi, Matthew Gilman, and Laura Kubzansky, take a look at how adverse social environments in early life play out across the life course. The study has been published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Can friends help friends quit smoking?

According to a new study published in  Journal of Health and Social Behavior and co-authored by RWJF alum Steven Haas, adolescents tend to be more powerful in influencing their friends to start smoking than in helping them to quit. “In order to become a smoker, kids need to know how to smoke, they need to know where to buy cigarettes and how to smoke without being caught, which are all things they can learn from their friends who smoke,” said Haas. “But, friends are unlikely to be able to provide the type resources needed to help them quit smoking.” The good news? If we can develop those kind of resources, aim them specifically at teens, and then leverage the power of peer influence, we could make great progress in helping teens quit smoking. 

Debt hurts more than just your credit rating

A recent study led by former RWJF scholar Elizabeth Sweet found that high student debt leads to a greater incidence of high blood pressure and depression in people ages 24-32. The study was featured in both Time and Forbes. With regard to cultural messages regarding an individual’s responsibility for debt, Sweet pointed out that debt, while often impossible to avoid, is stigmatized by our society. “[Debt] is going to be a way of life,” she saidwhich means that prevention and treatment of the associated adverse health effects is all the more important.

RWJF Alums study how marathon bombings impact adolescent mental health

Last Spring, RWJF alums Katie McLaughlin and Margaret Sheridan were in the middle of a study on trauma that, like so many of its kind, relied upon artificial situations created in a lab. But in the middle of this study, a real-life trauma occurred: the marathon bombing. As McLaughlin told New England Public Radio, this provided a unique opportunity to look at how children and adolescents who had experienced previous trauma and stress responded to a new trauma. The study ultimately found that early exposure to violence makes someone more, not less, sensitized to violence later on. McLaughlin and Sheridan also made another important discovery: the more that a young person watched coverage of the bombing and subsequent manhunt, the more likely he or she was to feel unsafe or under threat, and to develop mental health problems afterwards.

Media coverage of SV Subramanian’s work

Last week we featured a new study co-authored by Pop Center faculty member SV Subramanian, which found that economic growth has little to no effect on the nutritional status of the world’s poorest children. The study was subsequently discussed on NPR’s health news site, Shots, and in  The New York Times, where Paul Krugman quoted Subramanian in a blog post on economic growth and income distribution.

Gary King looks at Google Flu Trends

Its information-gathering abilities are no doubt impressive, but how good is Google at tracking cases of influenza? Pop Center faculty member Gary King, who recently co-authored a paper critiquing the accuracy of Google Flu Trends. A subsequent  New York Times article discussed King’s paper and raised interesting questions about the strengths and limitations of big data.

A reason to reduce anxiety, and an opportunity to do so!

We’ve long known that anxiety puts people at risk for coronary heart disease, but now a nationally representative longitudinal study of the US population has shown that anxiety also increases the risk of stroke. Pop Center faculty member Laura Kubzansky and RWJF alum Rebecca Thurston co-authored the study, which was published in Stroke.

And speaking of reducing anxiety, please join us for a cup of tea on April 28th, when we kick off our 50th Anniversary celebration with an Open House and Reception. All are welcome!