Author Archives: Kayla R Small

Amount of crime perceived and reported by adolescents is connected to their BMI and activity levels

Ann Forsyth was recently lead author on a paper titled “Perceived and Police-Reported Neighborhood Crime: Linkages to Adolescent Activity Behaviors anAnn Forsythd Weight Status.”
Published in Journal of Adolescent Health, the study addressed the relationships of perceived and objective reports of neighborhood crime to adolescent physical activity, screen media use, and BMI. BMI was positively associated with perceived crime among girls, reported crime in girls, and perceived crime in boys.

Kawachi on link between neighborhood social capital and participation in health checks

A community health screening

Ichiro Kawachi recently published a study in BMC Public Health revealing that higher level of neighborhood social capital was associated with higher probability of participating in the health check phase of a population-based lifestyle intervention, suggesting that activating social relations in the community may be an avenue for boosting participation rates in population-based health checks.

Nancy Krieger’s UC-Berkeley commencement address: Public Health, Embodied History, and Social Justice


Nancy Krieger, UC-Berkeley CommencementThis past May, Nancy Krieger had the honor of giving a commencement address at the University of California-Berkeley School of Public Health. Krieger’s talk reflected on events spanning from 1990 to the present and offered insights on the integral role of health equity in building a just and sustainable world.

Lisa Berkman to speak on “What Shapes Health”

forum2On Tuesday, March 3, Lisa Berkman will be part of a panel discussion on “What Shapes Health?” This event, co-hosted by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and NPR, will be webcast live at 12:30 pm EST. In addition to providing experts’ perspectives on what factors impact health, the panel will look at the public’s perception of who gets sick and why.