Author Archives: Nicole A Goguen

Multi-level analysis finds “micro-geographies” of child undernutrition in India

ivanFour Harvard Pop Center researchers, including research associate Iván Mejía-Guevara, PhD,  recent doctoral program graduate Aditi Krishna, PhD, former Bell Fellow Daniel Corsi, PhD, and faculty member SV Subramanian, PhD, are authors on a paper published in the Journal of South Asian Development that evaluates child undernutrition in India by level – individual, community and state – so that policies can more effectively target these determinants.

Paper by Bell Fellow Juli Simon Thomas Earns Her Status as Finalist for 2015 Kanter Award

Juli-Simon-Thomas_IMG_6895_HER-PICKHarvard Bell Fellow Juli Simon Thomas, PhD, is co-author on a paper that is one of five finalists (out of 2,500 articles published in 2014) for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Family Research. The paper, “Job Displacement among Single Mothers: Effects on Children’s Outcomes in Young Adulthood,” was published in the American Journal of Sociology. Congratulations to Juli on being a finalist for this international award!

When humanitarian disasters strike, do unconditional cash transfers improve use of health services & health outcomes?


Sze Yan (Sam) Liu, PhD, Harvard Pop Center principal analyst in the Research Core, is an author on a paper published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews that evaluates the impact of unconditional cash transfers (UCTs), a form of humanitarian assistance during disasters, on the use of healthcare services and health outcomes in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).

How can we influence teens & young adults to be smarter about sun exposure?

16615683187_3b05d5ab40_zHarvard Pop Center faculty member Ichiro Kawachi, MD, is an author of a paper published in Preventative Medicine that evaluates interventions aimed at decreasing unhealthy sun exposure in teens and young adults by leveraging principles of behavioral economics.

Harvard Pop Center faculty among top 25 most productive researchers of health inequalities

Four cited professors at HSPH

Ichiro Kawachi, SV Subramanian (Subu), Nancy Krieger, and David R. Williams are among the top 25 most productive researchers in the field of health inequalities, according to a study published in the journal Social Science & Medicine. The four Harvard Pop Center faculty members have published 462 studies, in total, on health inequalities between 1966 – 2014. In addition, the study ranked Social Science & Medicine, with co-editors-in-chief Kawachi and Subramanian, as the most productive journal in the field of health inequalities, accounting for 38% of all publications on the topic. Publications on health inequalities by Kawachi, Krieger and Williams were among the top 25 most cited.

How does disability impact the aging population of Latin America and Caribbean?

Collin Payne_0318_HIS PICK_resized for TWITTERAbout the same as it impacts the older adults of the United States, according to a study published in The Journals of Gerontology by Harvard Bell Fellow Collin Payne, PhD. The findings suggest that despite having been exposed to poor public health conditions for many years, the older adult population of Latin America and the Caribbean, countries experiencing quickly shifting age compositions, have a comparable level of functional health as those older adults of the U.S.

Is there a female disadvantage in India when it comes to nutrition?

dan and subuNot according to a paper published in the Journal of South Asian Development by former Bell Fellow Daniel Corsi, PhD, and Harvard Pop Center faculty member SV Subramanian (Subu), PhD.  Although previous studies have found there to be a female disadvantage in India when it comes to mortality, allocation of food within households, and healthcare coverage, the researchers in this study did not find there to be consistent evidence of female disadvantage in nutritional status based on using measures of anthropometric (height/weight for age, and  stunting/wasting/underweight) status.

Focused gun violence reduction program shown to be effective among gangs in Chicago

papachristos.resizedFormer Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholar Andrew Papachristos, PhD, is lead author on a study published in Criminology & Public Policy that suggests that a focused approach, such as Chicago’s Group Violence Reduction Strategy (VRS), to reducing gun violence significantly reduced gun violence (especially gunshot victimization) among gangs. Papachristos has recently commented on the national spike in homicides in Time and