Category Archives: News

Harvard Pop Center researchers to receive award for article on innovative use of life course work-family profiles to predict mortality risk

Four-researchers-win-award_Nov_edit_2015The Gerontological Society of America (GSA) has named four researchers affiliated with the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies as the recipients of the Richard Kalish Innovative Publication Awards for their paper published in the American Journal of Public Health on the innovative use of sequence analysis as a exposure assessment tool for life course research.  Erika Sabbath, ScD, who is lead author on the study and was a visiting scientist at the Harvard Pop Center, collaborated with Pop Center research associate Iván Mejía Guevara, PhD,  faculty member M. Maria Glymour, ScD, and Director Lisa Berkman, PhD. The distinguished awards will be presented at GSA’s 68th Annual Scientific Meeting in Orlando, Florida in November. Learn more in this EurekAlert.

Paper by Bell Fellow Juli Simon Thomas Earns Her Status as Finalist for 2015 Kanter Award

Juli-Simon-Thomas_IMG_6895_HER-PICKHarvard Bell Fellow Juli Simon Thomas, PhD, is co-author on a paper that is one of five finalists (out of 2,500 articles published in 2014) for the Rosabeth Moss Kanter Award for Excellence in Work-Family Research. The paper, “Job Displacement among Single Mothers: Effects on Children’s Outcomes in Young Adulthood,” was published in the American Journal of Sociology. Congratulations to Juli on being a finalist for this international award!

Harvard Pop Center faculty among top 25 most productive researchers of health inequalities

Four cited professors at HSPH

Ichiro Kawachi, SV Subramanian (Subu), Nancy Krieger, and David R. Williams are among the top 25 most productive researchers in the field of health inequalities, according to a study published in the journal Social Science & Medicine. The four Harvard Pop Center faculty members have published 462 studies, in total, on health inequalities between 1966 – 2014. In addition, the study ranked Social Science & Medicine, with co-editors-in-chief Kawachi and Subramanian, as the most productive journal in the field of health inequalities, accounting for 38% of all publications on the topic. Publications on health inequalities by Kawachi, Krieger and Williams were among the top 25 most cited.

Focused gun violence reduction program shown to be effective among gangs in Chicago

papachristos.resizedFormer Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholar Andrew Papachristos, PhD, is lead author on a study published in Criminology & Public Policy that suggests that a focused approach, such as Chicago’s Group Violence Reduction Strategy (VRS), to reducing gun violence significantly reduced gun violence (especially gunshot victimization) among gangs. Papachristos has recently commented on the national spike in homicides in Time and

Gender norms at play in weakening female labor-force participation in India; gender quotas & training may help

Pande-2015_325-x-225Harvard Pop Center’s Executive Committee and faculty member Rohini Pande, PhD, has co-authored an Op-Ed piece in the New York Times that explores why female labor-force participation is down in India despite economic growth, increasing educational attainment for girls, and decreased fertility rates.

Interventions addressing anxiety & depression have long-term mental health benefits for war-affected youth

Theresa BetancourtHarvard Pop Center faculty member Theresa Betancourt, ScD, is lead author on a study published in Pediatrics that assesses the longer-term impact of mental health interventions on war-affected youth in Sierra Leone. Learn more about the study in this Reuters article.

More years of secondary schooling, particularly for women, reduces HIV risk in Botswana

Fink_SubuA study published in the Lancet Global Health authored by Harvard Pop Center faculty members Gunther Fink, PhD, and S “Subu” V Subramanian, PhD, and colleagues, suggests that secondary schooling could be a cost-effective HIV prevention measure in HIV-endemic settings. Read more in this Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health press release.