Category Archives: Recently Published

Joyce Rosenthal publishes paper on vulnerability to heat-related mortality in New York City

Joyce Klein RosenthalFaculty member Joyce Klein Rosenthal has just published a new paper in Health and Place. “We hope that this neighborhood-level ecological analysis may help to inform the search for adaptive responses and modifiable exposures, as it examines finer-scale patterns of urban vulnerability than previous studies,” says Rosenthal of the study, which is the first analysis of the relationship between neighborhood characteristics and excess mortality in New York City neighborhoods during very hot days.

Impact of schedule control on quality of care in nursing homes

schedulePop Center director Lisa Berkman and faculty member Cassandra Okechukwu have contributed to a study that examines whether the quality of care in nursing homes can be predicted by schedule control (workers’ ability to decide work hours), independently of other staffing characteristics. The study found that higher schedule control did indeed have the power to improve quality of care, as it was associated a lower prevalence of pressure ulcers.

Gillman co-author on Group-Based Intervention Effective in Lowering Gestational Weight Gain Among Obese Women

gillmanHarvard Pop Center faculty member Matthew Gillman, MD, has co-authored a study that reports on the effectiveness of an intervention aimed at lowering the gestational weight gain (GWG) among obese women, as well as reducing the likelihood of large-for-gestational age (LGA) babies.

Aging Well; Examining Health of Those on Their Way to Becoming Centenarians

Hiram-Beltran-Sanchez-pic1Former Harvard Pop Center Bell Fellow Hiram Beltran-Sanchez, PhD, has co-authored a study that examines the long-term trajectories of disease, disability and cognitive functioning among potential centenarians, finding that those who lived to 100 had experienced overall better health along their journey to the century mark than the non-surviving members of their cohort, with about 25% with no chronic illness, 20% with no disability, and over 50% with no cognitive impairment.

Balanced Research Approach Called For to Explain Declining Life Expectancy of Low-Educated Women

montezFormer Harvard RWJF Scholar Jennifer Karas Montez, PhD, and a colleague have written an editorial, published in the American Journal of Public Health, that challenges researchers to apply a balanced approach, incorporating two criteria, to better understand a complex dilemma: why is life expectancy declining among low-income women?