Category Archives: Recently Published

Aging Well; Examining Health of Those on Their Way to Becoming Centenarians

Hiram-Beltran-Sanchez-pic1Former Harvard Pop Center Bell Fellow Hiram Beltran-Sanchez, PhD, has co-authored a study that examines the long-term trajectories of disease, disability and cognitive functioning among potential centenarians, finding that those who lived to 100 had experienced overall better health along their journey to the century mark than the non-surviving members of their cohort, with about 25% with no chronic illness, 20% with no disability, and over 50% with no cognitive impairment.

Balanced Research Approach Called For to Explain Declining Life Expectancy of Low-Educated Women

montezFormer Harvard RWJF Scholar Jennifer Karas Montez, PhD, and a colleague have written an editorial, published in the American Journal of Public Health, that challenges researchers to apply a balanced approach, incorporating two criteria, to better understand a complex dilemma: why is life expectancy declining among low-income women?

The Complexities of Assessing Health Impacts of Urbanicity in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa: A Pop Center Perspective

plos_croppedHarvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, and Bell Fellow Fahad Razak, MD have published a Perspective in PLoS Medicine in response to a study titled Urbanicity and Lifestyle Risk Factors for Cardiometabolic Diseases in Rural Uganda: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Having Better-Educated Offspring May Add Years to Parents’ Lives

friedmanHarvard RWJF HSS Alum Esther Friedman, PhD, has co-authored a study that suggests that making an investment in children’s higher education may have a big payoff for parents’ lifespan. The study has received media coverage, including this article in the Milwaukee Wisconsin Journal Sentinel.

Rwanda Study Shows Children With HIV-Positive Caregivers Suffer Same Mental Health Problems as HIV-Positive Children

Theresa BetancourtHarvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member Theresa Betancourt, Sc.D., and colleagues have published a study in Pediatrics that suggests that HIV-affected children (those living with an HIV-positive caretaker) could benefit from the same type of policies and programs that have helped HIV-positive children.