Category Archives: Uncategorized

Boston Adolescents Living in Socially Fragmented Neighborhoods Are Less Physically Active

Photo of Ichiro KawachiAccording to a new study co-authored by affiliated faculty member Ichiro Kawachi, MD, PhD, Boston adolescents who live in neighborhoods that have decreased residential stability were more likely to be physically inactive. This was the only socioeconomic characteristic that was found to be associated with physical inactivity.

The protective effect of education for cohorts graduating in bad times

educationTiming is everything. A study by David Cutler confirms that graduates who enter the labor market during bad economic times experience lower income, lower life satisfaction, greater obesity, more smoking and drinking later in life. The study also noted that education plays a protective role for these outcomes, as educated individuals, even when entering the market at times of high unemployment, have a much lower incidence of these outcomes than their uneducated counterparts. The study was published in Social Science and Medicine. 

Being Socially Well-Integrated Reduces Risk of Suicide

Tsai_AlexanderA 24-year prospective cohort study authored by Harvard RWJF Health & Societies Scholar Program Alum Alexander Tsai and Harvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member Ichiro Kawachi indicates that middle-aged men who are well-integrated socially have more than a 2-fold reduced risk for suicide. Being married, having a larger social network, and attending religious services on a regular basis showed the strongest protective associations. This study was published online July 14 in the Annals of Internal Medicine and received some press on dailyRx.

Minority neighborhoods found to have higher access to fast-food restaurants in the United States

The findings of a recent study co-authored by Harvard Pop Center faculty member S.V. Subramanian and Yerby Fellow Mariana C. Arcaya have been published in Health & Place. The study examines whether minority and poor neighborhoods have higher access to fast-food restaurants throughout the United States.

Harvard RWJF Alum Reanne Frank Comments on Hispanic Population Growth in Ohio Newspaper

Harvard RWJF Alum Reanne Frank is quoted in an article in The Columbus Dispatch on the growth of the Hispanic population. Frank, currently an associate professor of sociology at Ohio State University, explains that nationally Hispanic population is growing faster than non-Hispanic because more US-born Hispanics are reaching adulthood and having families, as opposed to the growth being driven by immigration.

Videos of Speaker Presentations at 50th Anniversary Symposium

In honor of its 50th anniversary, the Harvard Pop Center recently held a symposium titled Reimagining Societies in the Face of Demographic Change that featured presentations by Julio Frenk, Lisa Berkman, Babatunde Osotimehin, Jack Rowe, and Sir Michael Marmot, as well as a panel discussion including Pop Center Associate Director David Canning and faculty members Amitabh Chandra, SV Subramanian (Subu), and Mary Waters. Video recordings of these presentations and discussions are now available on our website.

Study shows increased cardiometabolic risk for female workers prone to work-related stress who don’t get adequate sleep or exercise

Harvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member Orfeu Buxton served as PI on a recently published paper in the American Journal of Industrial Medicine that investigated the effect of work-related stress, sleep deficiency, and physical activity on 10-year cardiometabolic risk among an all-female worker population.