News and Announcements

Balanced Research Approach Called For to Explain Declining Life Expectancy of Low-Educated Women

montezFormer Harvard RWJF Scholar Jennifer Karas Montez, PhD, and a colleague have written an editorial, published in the American Journal of Public Health, that challenges researchers to apply a balanced approach, incorporating two criteria, to better understand a complex dilemma: why is life expectancy declining among low-income women?

The protective effect of education for cohorts graduating in bad times

educationTiming is everything. A study by David Cutler confirms that graduates who enter the labor market during bad economic times experience lower income, lower life satisfaction, greater obesity, more smoking and drinking later in life. The study also noted that education plays a protective role for these outcomes, as educated individuals, even when entering the market at times of high unemployment, have a much lower incidence of these outcomes than their uneducated counterparts. The study was published in Social Science and Medicine. 

The Complexities of Assessing Health Impacts of Urbanicity in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa: A Pop Center Perspective

plos_croppedHarvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, and Bell Fellow Fahad Razak, MD have published a Perspective in PLoS Medicine in response to a study titled Urbanicity and Lifestyle Risk Factors for Cardiometabolic Diseases in Rural Uganda: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Having Better-Educated Offspring May Add Years to Parents’ Lives

friedmanHarvard RWJF HSS Alum Esther Friedman, PhD, has co-authored a study that suggests that making an investment in children’s higher education may have a big payoff for parents’ lifespan. The study has received media coverage, including this article in the Milwaukee Wisconsin Journal Sentinel.