News and Announcements

When it comes to diabetes management amongst Mexican immigrants, does generational status matter?

selena_310_x_440Harvard Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar Selena Oritz, PhD, is lead author on a study published in Medical Care that reveals that the odds of receiving certain disease-management exams were lower for those Mexican immigrants in California of higher generational status.

Schools’ influence on BMI lasts long after graduation

SV Subramanian and Adam LippertIt is well known that adolescent body mass index (BMI) shows school-level
clustering. And now a new study by SV Subramanian and Adam Lippert shows that years after leaving school, respondents’ BMIs are persistently clustered by the school they attended during adolescence. The study was published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

 

Access to healthcare and financial risk protection for older adults in Mexico

7970455aab7b918a77e06e08663f8f9dDavid Canning and Michael Reich recently co-authored a study in BMJ analyzing the effects of Social Security and Seguro Popular health insurances in Mexico. Previous studies have documented the benefits of these insurances as compared to no insurance, but how do they compare to each other?

Amount of crime perceived and reported by adolescents is connected to their BMI and activity levels

Ann Forsyth was recently lead author on a paper titled “Perceived and Police-Reported Neighborhood Crime: Linkages to Adolescent Activity Behaviors anAnn Forsythd Weight Status.”
Published in Journal of Adolescent Health, the study addressed the relationships of perceived and objective reports of neighborhood crime to adolescent physical activity, screen media use, and BMI. BMI was positively associated with perceived crime among girls, reported crime in girls, and perceived crime in boys.

Kawachi on link between neighborhood social capital and participation in health checks

A community health screening

Ichiro Kawachi recently published a study in BMC Public Health revealing that higher level of neighborhood social capital was associated with higher probability of participating in the health check phase of a population-based lifestyle intervention, suggesting that activating social relations in the community may be an avenue for boosting participation rates in population-based health checks.

Nancy Krieger’s UC-Berkeley commencement address: Public Health, Embodied History, and Social Justice


Nancy Krieger, UC-Berkeley CommencementThis past May, Nancy Krieger had the honor of giving a commencement address at the University of California-Berkeley School of Public Health. Krieger’s talk reflected on events spanning from 1990 to the present and offered insights on the integral role of health equity in building a just and sustainable world.

Why do women outlive men? Former Harvard Bell Fellow sheds light

Hiram-Beltran-Sanchez-pic1Hiram Beltran-Sanchez, PhD, a former Harvard Pop Center Bell Fellow, is lead author on a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that reveals that “excess male mortality” appears to be caused by cardiovascular disease and smoking-related deaths, as opposed to just biological differences between the genders. Learn more about the study in this article in the Los Angeles Times.

Interventions addressing anxiety & depression have long-term mental health benefits for war-affected youth

Theresa BetancourtHarvard Pop Center faculty member Theresa Betancourt, ScD, is lead author on a study published in Pediatrics that assesses the longer-term impact of mental health interventions on war-affected youth in Sierra Leone. Learn more about the study in this Reuters article.