News and Announcements

Obesity experts weigh in on influences & nuances of framing on obesity-prevention discourse

selena_310_x_440Harvard RWJF HSS Selena Ortiz, PhD, is lead author on a study published in the American Journal of Public Health that examines the influence of framing on the obesity prevention discourse. She and her colleagues conducted interviews with experts to learn more about two dominant frames: personal responsibility and environmental, looking closely at the environmental subframe of taste-engineering – food industry strategies designed to influence the overconsumption of certain foods and beverages.

Reducing Work-Family Conflict in Workplace Helps Improve Sleep

Berkman_Lisa_croppedA study by a team of researchers from the Work, Family & Health Network, including Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, has found that an intervention designed to reduce conflict between work and familial responsibilities has also been found to be effective at improving sleep. The study is published in the inaugural issue of Sleep Health, the journal of the National Sleep Foundation, and has been featured in articles in Medical Daily, and Inc. Learn more in this EurekAlert! release.

Finlay speaks on expert panel at United Nations on population & sustainable development

finlay_headshotHarvard Pop Center’s Director of the Research Core Jocelyn Finlay, PhD, presented as a member of an expert panel on “Population, sustainable development, and the post-2015 development agenda” at the United Nations on January 22. The panel was assembled to prepare for the upcoming 48th session of the Commission on Population and Development in 2015, when the theme will be “Realizing the future we want: integrating population issues into sustainable development, including in the post-2015 development agenda.”

Addressing challenge of selecting best health care intervention when benefits & value are often in gray zone

chandraAmitabh Chandra, PhD, Harvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member, is co-author of a Perspective published in the New England Journal of Medicine that addresses the challenge of determining the best health care intervention when benefits and value are often in the “gray-zone.”

To help kids get more sleep & feel better rested, researchers suggest limiting access to screens (small & big) in bedrooms

gortmakerSteven Gortmaker, PhD, and Elsie M. Taveras, MD, MPH, have published a study in Pediatrics that found that kids who slept in rooms that had devices with electronic screens (smartphones, TV, etc.)  slept for shorter durations and were more likely to report that they received insufficient rest.