News and Announcements

Following ban of Donald Sterling from the NBA, Harvard sociologist David Williams comments on racial inequalities in The Montreal Gazette

The ban of Donald Sterling from the NBA for racist comments has generated increased conversation about the presence and impact of racism in the U.S.  The Harvard Pop Center’s affiliated faculty member sociologist David Williams is one of several experts who share their insights in this feature in The Montreal Gazette.

More TV viewing (and among racial/ethnic minority children, the presence of a bedroom TV) was associated with shorter sleep from infancy to mid-childhood.

According to a recent study co-authored by Harvard Pop Center-affiliated faculty members Matthew W. Gillman, MD, SM, and Elsie M. Taveras, MD, MPH, more TV viewing (and among racial/ethnic minority children, the presence of a bedroom TV) was associated with shorter sleep from infancy to mid-childhood.

Harvard Pop Center researchers investigate effect of urban sprawl on body mass index among displaced Hurricane Katrina survivors

Three Harvard Pop Center-affiliated researchers, Yerby Fellow Mariana Arcaya, ScD, and faculty members Mary C. Waters, PhD,  and S.V. Subramanian, PhD, have provided the first natural experimental data on urban sprawl and body mass index (BMI). Their research results suggest that built environment may foster changes in weight.

RWJF Alums study how marathon bombings impact adolescent mental health

Last Spring, RWJF alums Katie McLaughlin and Margaret Sheridan were in the middle of a study on trauma that, like so many of its kind, relied upon artificial situations created in a lab. But in the middle of this study, a real-life trauma occurred: the marathon bombing. As McLaughlin told New England Public Radio, this provided a unique opportunity to look at how children and adolescents who had experienced previous trauma and stress responded to a new trauma. The study ultimately found that early exposure to violence makes someone more, not less, sensitized to violence later on. McLaughlin and Sheridan also made another important discovery: the more that a young person watched coverage of the bombing and subsequent manhunt, the more likely he or she was to feel unsafe or under threat, and to develop mental health problems afterwards.