News and Announcements

RWJF Alums study how marathon bombings impact adolescent mental health

Last Spring, RWJF alums Katie McLaughlin and Margaret Sheridan were in the middle of a study on trauma that, like so many of its kind, relied upon artificial situations created in a lab. But in the middle of this study, a real-life trauma occurred: the marathon bombing. As McLaughlin told New England Public Radio, this provided a unique opportunity to look at how children and adolescents who had experienced previous trauma and stress responded to a new trauma. The study ultimately found that early exposure to violence makes someone more, not less, sensitized to violence later on. McLaughlin and Sheridan also made another important discovery: the more that a young person watched coverage of the bombing and subsequent manhunt, the more likely he or she was to feel unsafe or under threat, and to develop mental health problems afterwards.

In certain occupations in India, men at greater risk than women for asthma

Harvard Pop Center Faculty Steering Committee Member SV Subramanian (Subu), Ph.D., Professor of Population Health and Geography at HSPH, has co-authored a study that has confirmed findings from high income countries showing a high prevalence of asthma in men in a number of occupational categories and sub categories, with no evidence of increased risks, however, for women in the same occupations.

Kawachi co-authors paper on effects of stress at work and home on two important contributors to cardiovascular disease

Pop Center-affiliated faculty member Ichiro Kawachi, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Social Epidemiology and Chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at HSPH, and former RWJF scholar Amy Non who was at the Pop Center from 2010 – 2012, have co-authored a study that investigates the effects of stress at work and at home on inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, two important contributors to the development of cardiovascular disease.

Killewald explores whether motherhood penalty is necessarily larger for low-wage women

Harvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member Alexandra Killewald, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Sociology at Harvard University, challenges the conclusion of Budig and Hodges (2010) that the motherhood penalty is larger for low-wage women by using an unconditional versus a conditional quantile regression model in a recently published study.

Can lay community health workers be trained to use mobile phone app to find cases of prenatal depression?

Former RWJF Scholar Alexander Tsai, PhD, MD has co-authored a study that explores whether lay community health workers in South Africa could be trained to conduct case finding using a mobile phone application to evaluate whether a woman is suffering from postnatal depression.

Team of Harvard Pop Center researchers publish paper on impact of unemployment on smoking and drinking

A team of Harvard Pop Center researchers, including current Yerby Fellow Mariana Arcaya, and Pop Center-affiliated faculty members Maria Glymour, Ichiro Kawachi, and SV Subramanian, have published a paper in Social Science & Medicine that looks at individual and spousal unemployment as predictors of smoking and drinking behavior.

Thurston examines link between MetS and subclinical atherosclerosis

Rebecca Thurston,  a former RWJF scholar at the Harvard Pop Center, has co-authored a study (based on participants in The Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation) recently published in Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association, that examines the association between MetS  (the metabolic syndrome) and subclinical atherosclerosis, and the role that race/ethnicity in midlife women may play.