News and Announcements

Helpful algorithm for quantifying cardiometabolic risk may help to motivate an individual’s commitment to prevention and intervention

Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman and affiliated researcher Orfeu Buxton have co-authored a study that presents a way to quantify cardiometabolic risk using modifiable, non-self-reported risk factors which may help to motivate an individual’s commitment to prevention and intervention. The study has been published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Are Adolescent Smokers Using E-Cigarettes to Help Them Quit?

One of our RWJF Health & Society Scholars, Adam Lippert, PhD, has recently published a paper on which adolescent subgroups are using e-cigarettes and whether they are using them to help them quit smoking. The study has been published in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

The Impact of Childhood Social Disadvantage

How does social disadvantage in childhood correlate to cardiometabolic function and chronic disease status 40 years down the line? RWJF alumna Amy Non, along with Pop Center faculty members Ichiro Kawachi, Matthew Gilman, and Laura Kubzansky, take a look at how adverse social environments in early life play out across the life course. The study has been published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Minority neighborhoods found to have higher access to fast-food restaurants in the United States

The findings of a recent study co-authored by Harvard Pop Center faculty member S.V. Subramanian and Yerby Fellow Mariana C. Arcaya have been published in Health & Place. The study examines whether minority and poor neighborhoods have higher access to fast-food restaurants throughout the United States.

David Cutler’s Earlier Optimism on Increasing Efficiency of Healthcare System May Have Been Right, say New Republic

Harvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member David Cutler is referenced in this article in New Republic on some recently released statistics on healthcare spending, indicating that the healthcare system may be becoming more efficient and services more widely utilized.

Harvard RWJF Alum Reanne Frank Comments on Hispanic Population Growth in Ohio Newspaper

Harvard RWJF Alum Reanne Frank is quoted in an article in The Columbus Dispatch on the growth of the Hispanic population. Frank, currently an associate professor of sociology at Ohio State University, explains that nationally Hispanic population is growing faster than non-Hispanic because more US-born Hispanics are reaching adulthood and having families, as opposed to the growth being driven by immigration.

Older American workers more likely to be depressed after job loss than their European counterparts

In support of a recent study on job loss and depression in the USA and Europe published in the International Journal of Epidemiology and reported by CBS News, Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman has written a commentary. The HSPH researchers and their colleagues found that older American workers (aged 50-64) are more likely to experience depression after job loss than their European counterparts. In Berkman’s commentary, The hidden and not so hidden benefits of work: identity, income and interaction, she discusses three kinds of loss that may be central to affecting health and well-being.

Can friends help friends quit smoking?

According to a new study published in  Journal of Health and Social Behavior and co-authored by RWJF alum Steven Haas, adolescents tend to be more powerful in influencing their friends to start smoking than in helping them to quit. “In order to become a smoker, kids need to know how to smoke, they need to know where to buy cigarettes and how to smoke without being caught, which are all things they can learn from their friends who smoke,” said Haas. “But, friends are unlikely to be able to provide the type resources needed to help them quit smoking.” The good news? If we can develop those kind of resources, aim them specifically at teens, and then leverage the power of peer influence, we could make great progress in helping teens quit smoking. 

Debt hurts more than just your credit rating

A recent study led by former RWJF scholar Elizabeth Sweet found that high student debt leads to a greater incidence of high blood pressure and depression in people ages 24-32. The study was featured in both Time and Forbes. With regard to cultural messages regarding an individual’s responsibility for debt, Sweet pointed out that debt, while often impossible to avoid, is stigmatized by our society. “[Debt] is going to be a way of life,” she saidwhich means that prevention and treatment of the associated adverse health effects is all the more important.

Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman is appointed president of APC

berkman.resizedHarvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman has recently been appointed president of The Association of Population Centers (APC). The organization, an independent group of universities and research groups whose mission is to foster collaborative demographic research and data sharing, translate basic population research for public policy decision-makers, and provide educational and training opportunities in population studies, was founded in 1991, and is open to any organization with a primary interest in population research and training.