News and Announcements

How does disability impact the aging population of Latin America and Caribbean?

Collin Payne_0318_HIS PICK_resized for TWITTERAbout the same as it impacts the older adults of the United States, according to a study published in The Journals of Gerontology by Harvard Bell Fellow Collin Payne, PhD. The findings suggest that despite having been exposed to poor public health conditions for many years, the older adult population of Latin America and the Caribbean, countries experiencing quickly shifting age compositions, have a comparable level of functional health as those older adults of the U.S.

Is there a female disadvantage in India when it comes to nutrition?

dan and subuNot according to a paper published in the Journal of South Asian Development by former Bell Fellow Daniel Corsi, PhD, and Harvard Pop Center faculty member SV Subramanian (Subu), PhD.  Although previous studies have found there to be a female disadvantage in India when it comes to mortality, allocation of food within households, and healthcare coverage, the researchers in this study did not find there to be consistent evidence of female disadvantage in nutritional status based on using measures of anthropometric (height/weight for age, and  stunting/wasting/underweight) status.

Focused gun violence reduction program shown to be effective among gangs in Chicago

papachristos.resizedFormer Harvard RWJF Health & Society Scholar Andrew Papachristos, PhD, is lead author on a study published in Criminology & Public Policy that suggests that a focused approach, such as Chicago’s Group Violence Reduction Strategy (VRS), to reducing gun violence significantly reduced gun violence (especially gunshot victimization) among gangs. Papachristos has recently commented on the national spike in homicides in Time and

Seeds for new book on behavioral economics planted at Pop Center

Roberto_BE book jacket_82x116Congratulations to Pop Center faculty member Ichiro Kawachi and former Harvard RWJF Health & Society program scholar Christina Roberto on the publication of their book Behavioral Economics and Public Health. This is the first book to apply the groundbreaking insights of behavioral economics to the persisting problems of health behaviors and behavior change. Seed funding to plan the book was provided by the Pop Center in 2014.

Which is better method for non-specialist researchers to use to create local population health estimates from real-world data?

Laura-Yasaitis_310_x_440Recent Pop Center Research Fellow Laura Yasaitis, PhD, Visiting Scientist Mariana Arcaya, ScD, and Faculty Member SV Subramanian (Subu), PhD, have authored a paper published in the international journal Health & Place that offers a rare side-by-side comparison of methods to create local population health estimates (in this case, acute myocardial infarction rates) from administrative data (Medicare claims data in California).

Brain scans lead to hopeful findings on ability of abused children to regulate mood

McLaughlin_Sheridan for news itemHarvard RWJF Health & Society Scholar program alumnae Katie McLaughlin, PhD, and Margaret Sheridan, PhD, are co-authors on a study published in the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry that found that individuals who had been abused as children could successfully learn and apply techniques to regulate their emotional reactions to “very stimulating emotional situations.” Learn more in this article.

Children who are physically abused or witness domestic violence at increased risk of higher BMI as adolescents

Sheridan_McLaughlinHarvard Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Program alumnae Margaret Sheridan, PhD,  and Katie McLaughlin, PhD, are co-authors on a study in Child Abuse & Neglect that finds that children who witnessed domestic violence had almost six times the odds of being overweight or obese as adolescents.

Gender norms at play in weakening female labor-force participation in India; gender quotas & training may help

Pande-2015_325-x-225Harvard Pop Center’s Executive Committee and faculty member Rohini Pande, PhD, has co-authored an Op-Ed piece in the New York Times that explores why female labor-force participation is down in India despite economic growth, increasing educational attainment for girls, and decreased fertility rates.

Unmet healthcare needs in adolescence is a predictor of poor adult health

Tracy Richmond and Mark SchusterA recent Pediatrics study co-authored by Pop Center Faculty Members Mark Schuster and Tracy Richmond showed that the odds of adverse adult health outcomes were higher among subjects who had reported unmet health care need in adolescence, compared with subjects with similar adolescent health outcomes, insurance coverage, and sociodemographic background but no unmet need. Importantly, the authors point out that lack of insurance isn’t the only barrier to meeting adolescent health needs., saying “adolescents forgo health care for many reasons, including concerns about confidentiality, cost, being treated with lack of respect, staff unfriendliness, and poor communication.”