News and Announcements

Can genes play a role in how we react to traumatic events?

marycwaters2aHarvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member Mary Waters, PhD, has co-authored a novel study that explores the interaction between genetic variants and exposure to Hurricane Katrina on post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic growth (positive psychological changes that can come from experiencing and processing a disaster and its aftermath).

Thurston’s Study on Hot Flashes and Weight Loss in the News

thurstonA study by Harvard RWJF Scholar Alum Rebecca Clark Thurston, PhD,  on the connection between a reduction in menopausal hot flashes and weight loss has received some press in The Pittsburgh Business Times. The study has been published in the July online issue of Menopause.

Helpful algorithm for quantifying cardiometabolic risk may help motivate prevention and intervention

Harvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman and affiliated researcher Orfeu Buxton have co-authored a study that presents a way to quantify cardiometabolic risk using modifiable, non-self-reported risk factors which may help to motivate an individual’s commitment to prevention and intervention. The study has been published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

Are Adolescent Smokers Using E-Cigarettes to Help Them Quit?

One of our RWJF Health & Society Scholars, Adam Lippert, PhD, has recently published a paper on which adolescent subgroups are using e-cigarettes and whether they are using them to help them quit smoking. The study has been published in the American Journal of Health Promotion.

The Impact of Childhood Social Disadvantage

How does social disadvantage in childhood correlate to cardiometabolic function and chronic disease status 40 years down the line? RWJF alumna Amy Non, along with Pop Center faculty members Ichiro Kawachi, Matthew Gilman, and Laura Kubzansky, take a look at how adverse social environments in early life play out across the life course. The study has been published in the American Journal of Epidemiology.

Minority neighborhoods found to have higher access to fast-food restaurants in the United States

The findings of a recent study co-authored by Harvard Pop Center faculty member S.V. Subramanian and Yerby Fellow Mariana C. Arcaya have been published in Health & Place. The study examines whether minority and poor neighborhoods have higher access to fast-food restaurants throughout the United States.