Tag Archives: andrew papachristos

Chicago police use Papachristos’ theories to target those at highest risk & curb violence

papachristos.resizedThe research of Harvard Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar program alum Andrew Papachristos, PhD, on social-network violence is featured in this article in the Chicago Sun Times. Papachristos and colleagues published a study in Social Science & Medicine that revealed that 70 percent of nonfatal injuries occur within networks containing 6 percent of the city’s population. Based on Papachristos’ social-network theories, the Chicago Police Department is generating lists of at-risk people, beat officers are paying closer attention to those individuals to try and prevent violence, and some social service intervention is being offered.

It’s a small world … for homicide victims

Photograph of Andrew PapachristosRWJF alum Andrew Papachristos  has shown that 41 percent of all gun homicide victims occur within a group that’s 4 percent of the population– or, to put it another way, belonging to that small network of 4 of the population increases your risk of being a homicide victim by 900 percent. Papachristos recently discussed these findings on NPR’s “Morning Edition.”

Papachristos’ Study on Key Role of Networks in Gun Violence featured in Yale Daily News

A recent article in the Yale Daily News highlights the findings of a study co-authored by Andrew Papachristos, PhD, a scholar in the RWJF Health & Society Scholars Program at the Pop Center from 2010-2012, which reveals that networks play a key role in gun violence and how this insight could lead to improved gun violence prevention programs.

Former RWJF Scholar Papachristos’ paper on network exposure & homicide victimization in African American community

Andrew Papachristos, PhD, a scholar in the RWJF Health & Society Scholars Program at the Pop Center from 2010- 2012, had an article titled “Network Exposure and Homicide Victimization in an African American Community” published in The American Journal of Public Health.