Tag Archives: BMI

Schools’ influence on BMI lasts long after graduation

SV Subramanian and Adam LippertIt is well known that adolescent body mass index (BMI) shows school-level
clustering. And now a new study by SV Subramanian and Adam Lippert shows that years after leaving school, respondents’ BMIs are persistently clustered by the school they attended during adolescence. The study was published in Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.


Amount of crime perceived and reported by adolescents is connected to their BMI and activity levels

Ann Forsyth was recently lead author on a paper titled “Perceived and Police-Reported Neighborhood Crime: Linkages to Adolescent Activity Behaviors anAnn Forsythd Weight Status.”
Published in Journal of Adolescent Health, the study addressed the relationships of perceived and objective reports of neighborhood crime to adolescent physical activity, screen media use, and BMI. BMI was positively associated with perceived crime among girls, reported crime in girls, and perceived crime in boys.

In India, is child’s BMI influenced more by mother’s BMI than father’s?

subramania_headshot-for-panelHarvard Pop Center faculty member S V Subramanian (Subu), PhD, and former Harvard Bell Fellow Daniel Corsi, PhD, are co-authors on a paper published in Archives of Disease in Childhood that explores the fetal roots of body mass index (BMI) in India.

Obese Kids Likely to Become Obese Teens, Study Shows

schuster Mark Schuster, MD, PhD, a Harvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member, is lead author on a study in Pediatrics that shows that over 80% of kids obese at age 11 are obese at age 16.  The study, online now and in the upcoming December print issue, is featured in U.S. News and World Report and Canada’s Global News.

Is Juice Gateway Drink to Higher BMI?

gillmanPop Center affiliated faculty members Matthew Gillman, MD, and Elsie Taveras, MD, have published a study in Obesity that examines the significance of beverage consumption during infancy and childhood and found that higher juice intake during infancy (at one year) was associated with higher juice and sugar-sweetened beverage intake and higher BMI during early and mid-childhood. The findings suggest that early juice intake could be a target for obesity prevention, and lend support to the recommendation of substituting water for fruit juice during infancy.