Tag Archives: cardiovascular disease

Can we learn about mortality risk by comparing data from self-reports vs. claims on heart attacks?

Laura-Yasaitis_310_x_440Three Harvard Pop Center researchers, including research fellow Laura C. Yasaitis, PhD, Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, and faculty member Amitabh Chandra, PhD, have published a study in Circulation, the journal of the American Heart Association, that compares self-reported data to administrative data (Medicare claims) on acute myocardial infarction events.

Earlier & frequent hot flashes may be linked to increased risk for cardiovascular disease

thurstonFormer Harvard Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholar Rebecca Thurston, PhD, is lead author on two studies, both to be presented at the American College of Cardiology’s annual Scientific Session in San Diego March 14 – 16, 2015, that suggest that early and frequent menopausal hot flashes may be linked to increased risk for heart disease. These findings, which focus on endothelial (the inner lining of blood vessels) function, have been receiving attention in the press; learn more from cbsnews.com, medicalxpress.com, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and DailyRx.com.

The Complexities of Assessing Health Impacts of Urbanicity in Rural Sub-Saharan Africa: A Pop Center Perspective

plos_croppedHarvard Pop Center Director Lisa Berkman, PhD, and Bell Fellow Fahad Razak, MD have published a Perspective in PLoS Medicine in response to a study titled Urbanicity and Lifestyle Risk Factors for Cardiometabolic Diseases in Rural Uganda: A Cross-Sectional Study.

Kawachi co-authors paper on effects of stress at work and home on two important contributors to cardiovascular disease

Pop Center-affiliated faculty member Ichiro Kawachi, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Social Epidemiology and Chair, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at HSPH, and former RWJF scholar Amy Non who was at the Pop Center from 2010 – 2012, have co-authored a study that investigates the effects of stress at work and at home on inflammation and endothelial dysfunction, two important contributors to the development of cardiovascular disease.