Tag Archives: Gunther Fink

More years of secondary schooling, particularly for women, reduces HIV risk in Botswana

Fink_SubuA study published in the Lancet Global Health authored by Harvard Pop Center faculty members Gunther Fink, PhD, and S “Subu” V Subramanian, PhD, and colleagues, suggests that secondary schooling could be a cost-effective HIV prevention measure in HIV-endemic settings. Read more in this Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health press release.

How does female literacy, under-5 mortality rate, and poverty level influence declining fertility rates in India?

Mohanty_Visiting ScientistHarvard Pop Center researchers, including visiting scientist Sanjay K. Mohanty, PhD, faculty member Gunther Fink, PhD, and associate director David Canning, PhD, have produced a PGDA working paper that explores the distal determinants of fertility decline across 640 Indian districts.

Increased supply of pediatricians leads to better vaccination coverage in Japan

finkHarvard Pop Center faculty members Gunther Fink, PhD, and Ichiro Kawachi, MD, PhD, are co-authors on a paper published in the Journal of Epidemiology that reveals a positive association between the supply of pediatricians in Japan with vaccination coverage, an indicator of preventive health service utilization.

Impact of family planning on child survival and development

familyPop Center faculty members Gunther Fink and Wafaie Fawzi have published a new study showing that postponing the age of first birth and increasing inter-pregnancy intervals—two outcomes made possible by family planning—have the potential to significantly reduce the prevalence of stunted growth and improve child development in LMICs (low and middle income countries).

Good news about children’s cognitive development abilities later in childhood after experiencing early growth delays

Harvard Pop Center affiliated faculty member Gunther Fink has co-authored a paper on childhood growth, schooling and cognitive development that suggests that children who have experienced early growth delays can make up for lost time when it comes to their cognitive development.

Low birth weight not associated with poor health outcomes among young adults in Brazil

Although a growing literature suggests that low birth weight increases the risk of poor health outcomes in adulthood, a new study co-authored by Pop Center faculty members SV Subramanian and Gunther Fink has found evidence to the contrary. Their findings, published in PLoS One, reveal that low birth weight did not result in poor health outcomes among young adults in Brazil. The researchers hope to expand upon on these findings by conducting further studies using larger samples and longer follow-ups.

Urbanization and Child Mortality

Pop Center faculty members, Gunther Fink and Kenneth Hill, examine the effects of increased urbanization on child mortality in developing countries in the Harvard School of Public Health study: “Urbanization and Child Mortality – Evidence from the Demographic and Health Surveys.