Tag Archives: Hiram Beltran-Sanchez

Homicide rate reverses life expectancy gains for men in Mexico

Hiram-Beltran-Sanchez-pic1Former Harvard Bell Fellow Hiram Beltran-Sanchez, PhD, is author on a study published in the journal HealthAffairs that has found that the unprecedented increase in homicides in Mexico between 2005 – 2010 resulted in reversing life expectancy gains for men, which had been improving for the prior 60 years. The study received much attention in the press, including a piece on fusion.net and medicaldaily.

Why do women outlive men? Former Harvard Bell Fellow sheds light

Hiram-Beltran-Sanchez-pic1Hiram Beltran-Sanchez, PhD, a former Harvard Pop Center Bell Fellow, is lead author on a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences that reveals that “excess male mortality” appears to be caused by cardiovascular disease and smoking-related deaths, as opposed to just biological differences between the genders. Learn more about the study in this article in the Los Angeles Times.

Aging Well; Examining Health of Those on Their Way to Becoming Centenarians

Hiram-Beltran-Sanchez-pic1Former Harvard Pop Center Bell Fellow Hiram Beltran-Sanchez, PhD, has co-authored a study that examines the long-term trajectories of disease, disability and cognitive functioning among potential centenarians, finding that those who lived to 100 had experienced overall better health along their journey to the century mark than the non-surviving members of their cohort, with about 25% with no chronic illness, 20% with no disability, and over 50% with no cognitive impairment.

Socio-Economic Factors and Smoking

Pop Center Bell fellow, Hiram Beltran-Sanchez, examines the socio-demographic and health factors associated with initiating and quitting smoking in Mexico in his paper “Links Between Socio-Economic Circumstances and Changes in Smoking Behavior in the Mexican Population: 2002-2010.