Tag Archives: Margaret Sheridan

Does childhood abuse affect blood pressure as early as adolescence?

Harvard Pop Center Sheridan_McLaughlinRWJF Health & Society Scholars program alumnae Margaret Sheridan, PhD, and Kate McLaughlin, PhD, are co-authors on a study in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology that finds that adolescents who had a history of child abuse had higher diastolic blood pressure (DBP), suggesting a potential pathway by which child abuse leads to hypertension.

Early childhood environments impact development of children’s stress response system development

McLaughlin_Sheridan for news itemHarvard Robert Wood Johnson Health & Society Scholars program alumnae Kate McLaughlin, PhD, and Margaret Sheridan, PhD, have published a study that shows a link between early caregiving environments and how children’s stress response systems develop. The negative effects of early deprivation can be mitigated if environment is improved before the age of two. The results of the study have received attention on ScienceDaily.com.

Sheridan explores neurogenetics approach to defining differential susceptibility to institutional care

sheridan.MHarvard Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Health & Society Scholar program alum Margaret A. Sheridan, PhD, has co-authored a study published in the International Journal of Behavioral Development that explores how genetic susceptibility interacts with extreme differences in the early caregiving environments (institutional vs. non-institutional) to predict distinct outcomes of neurodevelopment at age 8.

Youths and PTSD: Impact of media exposure following 2013 Boston Marathon bombing

Margaret Sheridan, PhD,sheridan.M a former Harvard RWJF Health & Society scholar, has published a study that could help to make it easier to identify youths most vulnerable to PTSD following a wide-scale traumatic event.

RWJF Alums study how marathon bombings impact adolescent mental health

Last Spring, RWJF alums Katie McLaughlin and Margaret Sheridan were in the middle of a study on trauma that, like so many of its kind, relied upon artificial situations created in a lab. But in the middle of this study, a real-life trauma occurred: the marathon bombing. As McLaughlin told New England Public Radio, this provided a unique opportunity to look at how children and adolescents who had experienced previous trauma and stress responded to a new trauma. The study ultimately found that early exposure to violence makes someone more, not less, sensitized to violence later on. McLaughlin and Sheridan also made another important discovery: the more that a young person watched coverage of the bombing and subsequent manhunt, the more likely he or she was to feel unsafe or under threat, and to develop mental health problems afterwards.