Tag Archives: Nancy Krieger

ICE found to be useful metric for public health monitoring

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Harvard Pop Center faculty member Nancy Krieger is lead author on a paper published in the American Journal of Public Health that evaluates the usefulness of the Index of Concentration at the Extremes (ICE) for public health monitoring of privilege and deprivation.

A call to make count of law enforcement-related deaths visible

krieger_for-twitterHarvard faculty member Nancy Krieger, PhD, is lead author on a study published in PLOS Medicine that calls for the CDC to to make law enforcement-related deaths (both those cases involving victims of police violence, as well as deaths of law enforcement agents in the line of duty) a “notifiable condition” which would allow public health workers to report this data in real-time. Learn about the how this increased visibility could help to prevent these types of deaths in this NPR story, as well as in this Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s news release.

Nancy Krieger’s UC-Berkeley commencement address: Public Health, Embodied History, and Social Justice


Nancy Krieger, UC-Berkeley CommencementThis past May, Nancy Krieger had the honor of giving a commencement address at the University of California-Berkeley School of Public Health. Krieger’s talk reflected on events spanning from 1990 to the present and offered insights on the integral role of health equity in building a just and sustainable world.

Age at Menarche: 50-Year Socioeconomic Trends Among US-Born Black and White Women.

Photo of Nancy KriegerPop Center faculty members Nancy Krieger and Jason Beckfield have published a study analyzing 50 years of data on the age at which US-born Black and White women begin menstruation. Their works shows that trends in age at menarche vary by socioeconomic position (SEP and race/ethnicity) in ways that pose challenges to several leading clinical, public health, and social explanations for timing of menarche.

As population health improves, what happens to health inequalities?

Given that health is improving at a greater rate among the better off than among those of lower socioeconomic status, will health inequities become greater over time? Pop Center faculty members Nancy Krieger and Jason Beckfield were part of a team that  looked at 50 years of data on socioeconomic health inequities in the US. The study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology, found that health inequities need not rise as population health improves.