Tag Archives: SV Subramanian

Videos of Speaker Presentations at 50th Anniversary Symposium

In honor of its 50th anniversary, the Harvard Pop Center recently held a symposium titled Reimagining Societies in the Face of Demographic Change that featured presentations by Julio Frenk, Lisa Berkman, Babatunde Osotimehin, Jack Rowe, and Sir Michael Marmot, as well as a panel discussion including Pop Center Associate Director David Canning and faculty members Amitabh Chandra, SV Subramanian (Subu), and Mary Waters. Video recordings of these presentations and discussions are now available on our website.

Media coverage of SV Subramanian’s work

Last week we featured a new study co-authored by Pop Center faculty member SV Subramanian, which found that economic growth has little to no effect on the nutritional status of the world’s poorest children. The study was subsequently discussed on NPR’s health news site, Shots, and in  The New York Times, where Paul Krugman quoted Subramanian in a blog post on economic growth and income distribution.

Low birth weight not associated with poor health outcomes among young adults in Brazil

Although a growing literature suggests that low birth weight increases the risk of poor health outcomes in adulthood, a new study co-authored by Pop Center faculty members SV Subramanian and Gunther Fink has found evidence to the contrary. Their findings, published in PLoS One, reveal that low birth weight did not result in poor health outcomes among young adults in Brazil. The researchers hope to expand upon on these findings by conducting further studies using larger samples and longer follow-ups.

Socioeconomic status and obesity in Cairo, Egypt: A heavy burden for all

Egypt has an extremely high obesity rate–much higher than would be expected given the country’s level of economic development. How does this paradox affect the correlation between SES and obesity? Faculty members Ichiro Kawachi, SV Subramanian, and Allan Hill conducted a study which found that obesity is prevalent across the SES spectrum in Cairo, i.e. there are no marked correlations between obesity and SES measures such as education, household expenditures, household assets, subjective wealth, and father’s education. The paper, published in Journal of Epidemiology and Global Health, analyzes these findings and considers how they should inform health policy.

Association Among Socioeconomic Status, Health Behaviors, and All-Cause Mortality in the United States

Pop Center faculty member SV Subramanian, faculty affiliate Maria Glymour, and former post-doctoral fellow Arijit Nandi have co-authored a study in Epidemiology assessing the extent to which smoking, alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity have mediated the association between socioeconomic status (SES) and all-cause mortality in a representative sample of US adults. Their findings point to the importance of social inequalities in unhealthy behaviors.

Do Youth Compensate for Increased School-Day Activity?

In their recent study, “School-Day and Overall Physical Activity Among Youth“, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Pop Center faculty members Steven L. Gortmaker and SV Subramanian, find that increasing physical activity during the school day leads to greater physical activity outside the classroom.

 

Foreclosures contribute to the obesity epidemic

Neighborhood foreclosures are associated with local population weight gain finds Pop Center faculty members, Maria Glymour, Ichiro Kawachi and SV Subramanian, and Pop Center research scientist, Mariana Arcaya, in their recent study published in the American Journal of Public Health.