HPRC News & Events

VIDEO: Dr. Steven Gortmaker featured in NEJM roundtable discussion on “Health Promotion and the State”

“Some major U.S. public health problems are perpetuated and exacerbated at least in part by lifestyle choices and individual behavior. Policymakers at all levels of government are struggling to find ways of intervening to promote wellness and reduce unhealthy behaviors without overstepping the limits of their authority or infringing on personal liberties. What can and should government do to reduce obesity and tobacco use?”

Watch experts Thomas Farley, Steven Gortmaker, and Cass Sunstein address these and other questions about health promotion and the state in this video roundtable discussion

Boston launches ad campaign against sugary beverages

(The Boston Globe) — “Mayor Thomas M. Menino of Boston and public health authorities unveiled a public awareness campaign…that urges residents to reduce consumption of sweetened beverages…The campaign, which will include a media blitz, premieres a month before an executive order by Menino phases out the sale, advertising, and promotion of sugar-sweetened beverages in all city buildings…The…federally funded campaign will blanket Boston…[and] focus on black and Latino neighborhoods.”

Government-Led Efforts Targeting Eating Habits of Children Needed to Curb Worldwide Obesity Epidemic

Tax on Sugary Drinks, Limits on Marketing to Children Among Cost-effective Strategies

For immediate release: Thursday, August 25, 2011, 6:30 PM ET

Boston, MA – The global obesity epidemic has been escalating for three to four decades, yet long-term prevention efforts have barely begun and are inadequate, according to a new paper from international public health experts published in the August 25, 2011 edition of the journal The Lancet. The authors call on governments around the world to launch a coordinated effort to monitor, prevent, and control obesity, and the long-term health, social and economic costs associated with it.

Sugar Withdrawal – Boston high school students have fewer sweetened drinks

(The Boston Globe) — “The seven-year-old policy restricting the sale of sugar-sweetened beverages in Boston Public Schools appears to be paying off: Consumption dropped among high school students…The drop in Boston compares with very little change…among teenagers nationally…The Massachusetts Department of Public Health, at the direction of state legislators…proposed instituting a similar policy in all the state’s public schools that would take effect in the 2012-2013 school year.”