Sebastien Haneuse

Sebastien Haneuse

Associate Professor of Biostatistics

Department of Biostatistics

Department of Biostatistics

Building 2, Room 407
655 Huntington Avenue
Boston, Massachusetts 02115

Research

My research interests focus on the design and analysis of observational studies, primarily in the context of epidemiological studies. Broad themes include:

  • The use of biased sampling schemes to mitigate biases that commonly arise in observational studies and comparative effectiveness research, including confounding and selection bias.
  • The use of biased sampling schemes in the context of prediction studies.
  • The use of data from large, complex administrative databases for public health research, including Medicare, SEER-Medicare and electronic medical records.
  • The development of new strategies for monitoring and evaluation of public health programs in resource-limited settings.
  • The analysis of semi-competing risks survival data, where interest lies the distribution of some non-terminal event but that observation time is subject to truncation by death.
  • The use of non-parametric Bayesian formulations to (i) gain insights into mechanisms and/or etiology, and (ii) overcome the consequences of model misspecification, particularly in the analysis of correlated or longitudinal data.
  • Methods for causal inference when the treatment of interest is continuous.

From a substantive perspective, my current collaborations are in the following areas:

  • The long-term relative effects on weight of different treatment strategies for depression.
  • The comparative effectiveness of surgical weight loss treatments, including bariatric surgery.
  • Community programs that aim to increase parental engagement in the prevention of childhood obesity
  • Outcomes following thoracic surgery for lung and esophageal cancer.
  • Nationwide provider profiling for advanced health conditions, such as cancer and Alzheimers disease.
  • The evaluation of anti-retroviral treatment programs in Malawi.

 

Education

Ph.D. Biostatistics, 2004, University of Washington.
MSc. Biostatistics, 2000, University of Washington.
MSc. Mathematics, 1998, Northern Arizona University.
BSc. Probability and Statistics, 1995, University of Sheffield.