Rob Buelow, MS

Rob Buelow, MS

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Rob new photo (rob_buelow_new_photo.jpg)“It’s no surprise that so many people struggle with some form of disordered eating. We live in a society that bombards us with unrealistic messages and expectations about weight, body image, and beauty. The true challenge for public health is to work upstream to create a culture where people are healthy and happy being themselves.”  –Rob

Robert Buelow graduated with a Master of Science degree in the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health at HSPH. Rob is working with STRIPED as the project manager for a pilot evaluation of Fat Talk Free Week, a national social media campaign to interrupt the constant drone of body-disparaging commentary, especially among girls and women, and encourage more body-positive and constructive conversation. His specific research interest is on the potential role of bystander intervention as a strategy to interrupt and redirect fat talk. 

Rob’s professional background is in violence prevention and men’s anti-sexism activism. This year, with the support of the Women, Gender, and Health Interdisciplinary Concentration and HSPH Dean Frenk’s Women and Health Initiative, Rob organized the first ever White Ribbon Campaign at HSPH as part of an international effort to engage men in ending violence against women. He has worked with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as an evaluation consultant for a state-run lead poisoning prevention initiative. Bringing together his role as Vice President of Student Life at HSPH and his savvy in health communications and social marketing, Rob masterminded a creative new initiative to reach his fellow students in the most unlikely of places: Stall Stories, a weekly newsletter posted in the bathroom stalls of the school, delivers engaging stories and news about events and opportunities to get involved in the many activities around the school to advance health equity and social change. Rob’s work is featured in the magazine Harvard Public Health (Roeder A. Accentuating the Positive. In The Art of Getting Things Done. Harvard Public Health Spring-Summer 2012).