Kathy Fallon Lambert is a Senior Advisor with The Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health (Harvard Chan C-CHANGE) and Co-founder of the Science Policy Exchange. Lambert is a national leader in the design of university programs in actionable science. Her work with the Center examines how big data and models can be used to quantify the health and environment benefits of actions to mitigate climate change. She collaborates with health scientists, social scientists, communication experts, and community leaders to accelerate change with health and climate science.

Since 2014, Lambert has led a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary team of scientists to analyze and communicate the air quality, health, and ecosystem impacts of carbon emission standards. Through this prescient initiative she and colleagues published maps of the costs and air quality and health benefits of different power plant carbon standards. From 2010 to 2018, Kathy was the Science and Policy Integration Project Director at Harvard University’s Harvard Forest where she was the Principal Investigator of a National Science Foundation grant to understand how stakeholder engagement and land-use scenario science can inform and motivate community decisions.

Prior to her post at Harvard Forest, Lambert served as the first executive director of the Hubbard Brook Research Foundation, a non-profit organization associated with the research site where acid rain was discovered in North America. There she created the Science Links program to bridge gaps between biogeochemistry research and air and water quality policy. Her publications and communication efforts informed updates to the acid rain title of the U.S. Clean Air Act and the U.S. Mercury and Air Toxics Standards.

Lambert holds a master’s degree from the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies and a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology and Environmental Studies from Dartmouth College where she was awarded the Ralph P. Holben prize in sociology. She has been a Harvard Bullard Fellow, Schepp Scholar, Switzer Fellow, two-time Switzer Environmental Leadership grantee, and recipient of the EPA Region 1 Environmental Merit Award.

ACE rule excluded key details, researchers say

Our Senior Adviser, Kathy Fallon Lambert, discusses the negative effects of EPA's new Affordable Clean Energy Rule.

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U.S. EPA Administrator touts new energy plan despite agency analysis

Our Senior Adviser, Kathy Fallon Lambert, discusses how the EPA's new Affordable Clean Energy Rule is counterproductive.

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Power Plant

Public Comments Opposing EPA’s Proposal to Undermine Mercury Standards for Coal-fired Power Plants

Our Energy & Health team joined Harvard Law School to submit comments on EPA's proposed rollback of the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards.

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The definition of "boundary spanning” has evolved since the term first emerged in the 1950s. Read about present-day trends and best practices in the AAAS blog.

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Carbon Standards Examined

A new study published in the journal Environmental Research Letters predicts that, compared to no carbon regulations, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) rule would increase greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 18 states and Washington, D.C. in 2030 due to an “emissions rebound,” raising questions about the rule’s standing under the Clean Air Act. Sulfur…

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Power Plant

Clean Power Plan Replacement Could Lead to Increased Emissions

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Trump replacement for Obama climate plan worse than doing nothing – study

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Some states’ emissions would be higher under Trump climate rule, study finds

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Reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from power plants can have important “co-benefits” for public health by reducing emissions of air pollutants.

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Mercury Matters 2018: A Science Brief for Journalists and Policymakers

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