Publications

Flyer of Addressing COVID-19 Testing Inequities Among Underserved Populations in Massachusetts paper

Addressing COVID-19 testing inequities among underserved populations in Massachusetts: a rapid qualitative exploration of health center staff, partner, and resident perceptions

Lee RM, Handunge VL, Augenbraun SM, Nguyen H, Huebner-Torres C, Ruiz A, Emmons KM, the RADx-MA Research Partnership

Abstract: Access to COVID-19 testing has been inequitable and misaligned with community needs. However, community health centers have played a critical role in addressing the COVID-19 testing needs of historically disadvantaged communities. The aim of this paper is to explore the perceptions of COVID-19 testing barriers in six Massachusetts communities that are predominantly low-income and describe how these findings were used to build tailored clinical-community strategies to address testing inequities.

Download the lay research summary here.

Implementing expanded COVID-19 testing in Massachusetts community health centers through community partnerships: Protocol for an interrupted time series and stepped wedge study design

Kruse G, Pelton-Cairns L, Taveras E, Dargon-Hart S, Gundersen G, Lee RM, Bierer BE, Lawlor E, LaRocque R, Marcus JM, Davies ME, Emmons K, the RADx-MA Research Partnership

Abstract: Community Health Centers (CHCs) are a critical source of care for low-income and non-privately insured populations. During the pandemic, CHCs have leveraged their infrastructure and role as a trusted source of care to engage the communities they serve in COVID-19 testing.

Collaboration networks of the implementation science centers for cancer control: a social network analysis

Korn AR, Huang GC, Easterling D, Gundersen DA, Ramanadhan S, Vu T, Angier H, Brownson RC, Haire-Joshu D, Oh AY, Schnoll R.

Abstract: Multi-center research initiatives offer opportunities to develop and strengthen connections among researchers. These initiatives often have goals of increased scientific collaboration which can be examined using social network analysis.

Building trust in COVID-19 vaccines and beyond through authentic community investment

Ojikutu BO, Stephenson KE, Mayer KH, Emmons KM.

Abstract: COVID-19 vaccine development has advanced at lighting speed. Unfortunately, as the science of vaccine development has swiftly progressed, the equally important science of community engagement, which should guide the establishment of mutually beneficial partnerships and promote eventual vaccine uptake, has lagged behind. Research methods focused on the development of effective public health interventions place communities—groups with shared culture, norms, beliefs, or language—at their core and emphasize the primacy of community ownership as essential for uptake and sustainability. Yet, communities of color (i.e., Black, Latinx, and Indigenous communities), who remain at highest risk for infection, have been peripheral, not central actors in the pursuit of COVID-19 vaccines. Instead, the tripartite relationship between industry, government, and academia has dominated the research enterprise related to COVID-19.

Applying an equity lens to characterizing the process and reasons for an adaptation to an evidenced-based practice

Aschbrenner KA, Mueller NM, Banerjee S, Bartels SJ.

Abstract: Adaptations to evidence-based practices (EBPs) are common but can impact implementation and patient outcomes. In our prior research, providers in routine care made a fidelity-inconsistent adaptation to an EBP that improved health outcomes in people with serious mental illness (SMI). The purpose of this study was to characterize the process and reasons for the adaptation using a framework for reporting adaptations and modifications to EBPs, with a focus on equity.

Pragmatic approaches to analyzing qualitative data for implementation science: an introduction

Ramanadhan S, Revette AC, Lee RM, Aveling EL.

Abstract: Qualitative methods are critical for implementation science as they generate opportunities to examine complexity and include a diversity of perspectives. However, it can be a challenge to identify the approach that will provide the best fit for achieving a given set of practice-driven research needs. After all, implementation scientists must find a balance between speed and rigor, reliance on existing frameworks and new discoveries, and inclusion of insider and outsider perspectives. This paper offers guidance on taking a pragmatic approach to analysis, which entails strategically combining and borrowing from established qualitative approaches to meet a study’s needs, typically with guidance from an existing framework and with explicit research and practice change goals.

COVID-19 mitigation for high-risk populations in Springfield Massachusetts USA: a health systems approach

Pirraglia PA, Huebner Torres C, Collins J, Garb J, Kent M, Perez McAdoo S, Oloruntola-Coates M, Smith JM, Thomas A.

Abstract: Numerous reports have demonstrated the disproportionate impact that COVID-19 has had on vulnerable populations. Our purpose is to describe our health care system’s response to this impact.

The prevalence of dissemination and implementation research and training grants at National Cancer Institute–Designated Cancer Centers

Mueller NM, Hsieh A, Ramanadhan S, Lee RM, Emmons KM.

Abstract: Dissemination and implementation (D&I) research is a key factor in the uptake and use of evidence-based cancer control interventions. National Cancer Institute (NCI)–designated cancer centers are ideal settings in which to further D&I knowledge. The purpose of this study was to summarize the characteristics of NCI-funded D&I science grants in the nation’s cancer centers to understand the nature, extent, and opportunity for this key type of translational work.

Advancing gender equity in the academy

Beidas RS, Hannon PA, Emmons KM.

Abstract:

Implementation science offers a rigorous set of tools to help mitigate long-standing and worsening gender disparities in academia.

The impact of the social determinants of health on disparities in inflammatory bowel disease

Anyane-Yeboa A, Quezada S, Rubin DT, Balzora S.

Abstract: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is rising in racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States, and socioeconomic, racial, and ethnic disparities in IBD are increasingly being identified. In addition, there has been great appreciation for the social determinants of health as contributors to these disparities, and that upstream social determinants of health propagate downstream poor health outcomes in IBD. We propose strategies to achieve health equity in IBD that target the medical trainee, provider, practice, community, industry, and policy levels.

Collaboration networks of the implementation science centers for cancer control: a social network analysis

Jacob RR, Korn AR, Huang GC, Easterling D, Gundersen DA, Ramanadhan S, Vu T, Angier H, Brownson RC, Haire-Joshu D, Oh AO, Schnoll R.

Abstract: Multi-center research initiatives offer opportunities to develop and strengthen connections among researchers. These initiatives often have goals of increased scientific collaboration which can be examined using social network analysis.

Implementing expanded COVID-19 testing in Massachusetts community health centers through community partnerships: Protocol for an interrupted time series and stepped wedge study design

Kruse GR, Pelton-Cairns L, Taveras EM, Dargon-Hart S, Gundersen DA, Lee RM, Bierer BE, Lawlor E, LaRocque RC, Marcus JL, Davies ME, Emmons KM, the RADx-MA Research Partnership

Abstract: Community Health Centers (CHCs) are a critical source of care for low-income and non-privately insured populations. During the pandemic, CHCs have leveraged their infrastructure and role as a trusted source of care to engage the communities they serve in COVID-19 testing.

Grounding implementation science in health equity for cancer prevention and control

Adsul P, Chambers D, Brandt HM, Fernandez ME, Ramanadhan S, Torres E, Leeman J, Baquero B, Fleischer L, Escoffery C, Emmons KM, Soler M, Oh A, Korn AR, Wheeler S, Shelton RC.

Abstract: The past decade of research has seen theoretical and methodological advances in both implementation science and health equity research, opening a window of opportunity for facilitating and accelerating cross-disciplinary exchanges across these fields that have largely operated in siloes. In 2019 and 2020, the National Cancer Institute’s Consortium for Cancer Implementation Science convened an action group focused on ‘health equity and context’ to identify opportunities to advance implementation science. In this paper, we present a narrative review and synthesis of the relevant literature at the intersection of health equity and implementation science, highlight identified opportunities (i.e., public goods) by the action group for advancing implementation science in cancer prevention and control, and integrate the two by providing key recommendations for future directions.