Declining mercury levels in tuna a positive development

November 2016. Boston, MA. Elsie Sunderland, associate professor of environmental science and engineering in the Department of Environmental Health at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, was quoted in a November 30, 2016 Bloomberg article about a reported decline in mercury levels in Atlantic bluefin tuna.

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Pregnant women may get too much mercury by following U.S. seafood advice

March 2016. Boston, MA. Pregnant women who follow government seafood recommendations may be exposing their babies to too much toxic mercury, according to a new report from the Environmental Working Group (EWG).

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Cystic fibrosis and arsenic poisoning linked to same damaged protein

February 2015. Boston, MA. A new Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health co-authored study provides further evidence linking both arsenic poisoning and the chronic respiratory disease cystic fibrosis (CF) to damage in the CFTR protein.

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Human health risks from hydroelectric projects

November 2016. Boston, MA. In a new study, Harvard University researchers find over 90 percent of potential new Canadian hydroelectric projects are likely to increase concentrations of the neurotoxin methylmercury in food webs near indigenous communities.

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Flint’s water crisis ‘infuriating’ given knowledge about lead poisoning

January 2016. Boston, MA. Harvard Chan School’s Philippe Grandjean, an expert in how environmental pollution impairs brain development, says that Flint, Michigan’s water crisis could have been prevented, given the United States’ long experience with lead contamination—and how to prevent it.

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New findings on mercury contamination and seafood

November 2012. Boston, MA. Mercury released into the air and then deposited into oceans is increasingly contaminating seafood commonly eaten by people in the United States and globally, report scientists from Dartmouth College, Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH), and colleagues from other institutions in new research in the current issue of the journal Environmental Research and a companion report.

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Mechanism identified through which lead may harm neural cells, children’s neurodevelopment

August 2016. Boston, MA. Researchers have identified a potential molecular mechanism through which lead, a pervasive environmental toxin, may harm neural stem cells and neurodevelopment in children. The study, from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, suggests that lead exposure can lead to oxidative stress—a process that can change cell behavior and has been linked with health problems—among certain proteins within neural stem cells.

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A call for reducing fluoride levels in drinking water

March 2015. Boston, MA. Some of the controversy between scientists, dental professionals, anti-fluoride activists, town officials, and others in Massachusetts and across the U.S. might be reduced if the U.S. Health and Human Services (HHS) proposal for lowering fluoride levels in U.S. drinking water was finalized, according to a Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health researcher.

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Impact of fluoride on neurological development in children

July 2012. Boston, MA. In a meta-analysis, researchers from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) and China Medical University in Shenyang for the first time combined 27 studies and found strong indications that fluoride may adversely affect cognitive development in children. Based on the findings, the authors say that this risk should not be ignored, and that more research on fluoride’s impact on the developing brain is warranted.

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