Dilpreet Singh won the New Investigator Award at the National Nanotechnology Initiative international QEEN conference

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From left: Dr. Michael A. Meador, Director, National Nanotechnology Coordination Office (NNCO), Dilpreet Singh, Award winner, Dr. Treye Thomas, Leader, Chemical Hazards Program, U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission.

Dilpreet Singh, a second year doctoral student in Prof. Philip Demokritou’s Lab for Environmental Health Nanoscience at the Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, has won the New Investigator Award at the InternationalQEEN (Quantifying Exposure to Engineered Nanomaterials from Manufactured Products) conference sponsored by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) in collaboration with the NNI (National Nanotechnology Initiative) at Washington D.C. from July 7-8, 2015.

Dilpreet’s poster presentation entitled “Nano-waste: Environmental health and safety (EHS) implications during thermal degradation/incineration of nano-enabled products at their end-of-life” was the winner in the New Investigators Competition. The two-day conference was attended by 150 experts from academia, federal representatives, and industries and focused primarily on understanding the exposure science related to engineered nanomaterials. Dilpreet’s research is part of an NSF funded research project which focuses on the environmental health and safety implications of Nano-enabled products at their end of life during thermal decomposition and incineration.

Dilpreet Singh explains the concept of his research at the National Nanotechnology Initiative international QEEN conference.
Dilpreet Singh explains the concept of his research to Dr. Chuck Geraci.

“By understanding the science behind potential release and exposure of engineered nanomaterials across the lifecycle of a nano-enabled product, one can move forward in the direction of sustainable nanotechnology development by coming up with novel product designs that would minimize potential exposure, and hence risk,” said Singh in an interview with Dr. Chuck Geraci, Associate Director for Nanotechnology at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).