All articles related to "Joseph Gardner Allen":

E-cigs pack a harmful punch

Although e-cigarettes may be a useful tool for people trying to quit regular cigarettes, they also contain harmful chemicals, including formaldehyde and diacetyl, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Joseph Allen. In an April 4,…

Plants, fresh air, natural light make workplaces healthy

For office buildings to be truly healthy places to work, they should have plenty of leafy plants, fresh air, and natural lighting, according to environmental health experts. Inspired by “biophilic design”—a term that comes from the Greek for…

Op-ed: A call for products free of toxic chemicals

A group of widely used toxic chemicals linked with several kinds of cancer, high cholesterol, and suppression of vaccine effectiveness in children is now also found in air and water around the globe and in nearly all of…

School buildings can influence student health, performance

Environmental exposures in school buildings—to mold, poorly ventilated air, uncomfortable temperatures, inadequate lighting, or noise—can negatively impact student health, thinking, and performance, according to a new report from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health’s Healthy Buildings Program.…

‘Healthy’ buildings can improve workers’ performance

Improving lighting, ventilation, and heat in office buildings can boost workers’ performance and productivity and can even help them sleep better at night—which is why developers, architects, and businesses are becoming increasingly interested in “healthy” buildings. In a…

Can businesses make a profit while saving the planet?

September 29, 2016—As cofounder of the organization that created the LEED green building rating system, Rick Fedrizzi spends a lot of time working to help business people and environmental activists see themselves as allies. Speaking at the kickoff…

Can ‘green’ offices sharpen productivity?

People who work in “green” offices that are well-ventilated and have low levels of indoor pollutants and carbon dioxide may have significantly better cognitive function than people working in more traditional office environments, according to a recent study…