All articles related to "biostatistics":

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Our bugs, ourselves

[ Spring 2013 ] Microbes in and on our bodies outnumber human cells 10 to 1—and may determine how we get sick and stay well. The story of public health has largely been a story of conquering infections,…

HSPH to launch second public health course on edX

January 2, 2013 -- Harvard School of Public Health’s new online course, “Health in Numbers: Quantitative Methods in Clinical and Public Health Research,” an introduction to biostatistics and epidemiology, has drawn 53,857 students from all over the world.…

New HSPH online edX course will reach worldwide audience

October 3, 2012 -- Quantitative Methods Course Teaches Building Blocks of Public Health Research It’s time for biostatistics and epidemiology class. The professor is discussing Scotsman James Lind, who, in the mid-1700s, conducted one of the first-ever clinical experiments.…

Off the cuff: Starting a revolution

[ Fall 2012 ] In May 2012, you resigned from the editorial board of Genomics, protesting the exorbitant subscription fees that scientific journals charge. Researchers and institutions in poor nations often cannot afford to pay and are effectively shut out of…

HIV-infected patients at higher risk of metabolic syndrome

HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of metabolic syndrome, and a new study helps identify patients most in need of interventions to reduce the risk. Metabolic syndrome, a condition characterized by a group…

HSPH’s Curtis Huttenhower honored by President Obama

Curtis Huttenhower, assistant professor of computational biology and bioinformatics in the Department of Biostatistics at HSPH, was one of 96 researchers named by President Obama as recipients of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers, the…

The promise of big data

[ Spring/Summer 2012 ] Petabytes of raw information could provide clues for everything from preventing TB to shrinking health care costs—if we can figure out how to use them. Harvard School of Public Health microbiologist Sarah Fortune went…